Subjects

The Department offers many subjects for undergraduates and graduates alike. These are broken down into core, specialized and research subjects. Each year the Department offers 25 undergraduate and more than 90 graduate subjects of instruction from which each student designs, with faculty guidance, an individual program of study that matches their interests and experiences. 

The materials of many of the classes developed by DUSP faculty are provided free to the public through MIT's Open CourseWare site. In addition, DUSP is continuing to develop online offerings on multiple platforms, including: EdXMITxPro, and the MIT Case Study Initiative.

Conflict Chart

Filter by
Semester
Level
Type
11.001J
4.250J

Introduction to Urban Design and Development

Examines the evolving structure of cities and the way that cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas can be designed and developed. Surveys the ideas of a wide range of people who have addressed urban problems. Stresses the connection between values and design. Demonstrates how physical, social, political and economic forces interact to shape and reshape cities over time. Introduces links between urban design and urban science.

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 11:00 - 12:30PM
Location
2-105
HASS
H
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.011

The Art and Science of Negotiation

Introduction to negotiation theory and practice. Applications in government, business, and nonprofit settings are examined. Combines a "hands-on" personal skill-building orientation with a look at pertinent tactical and strategic foundations. Preparation insights, persuasion tools, ethical benchmarks, and institutional influences are examined as they shape our ability to analyze problems, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes in social, organizational, and political circumstances characterized by interdependent interests. Enrollment limited by lottery; consult class website for information and deadlines. 

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 2:00 - 3:30PM
Location
9-255
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.015J

Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History

Focuses on a series of short, complicated, traumatic events that shed light on American politics, culture, and society. Events studied may include the rendition of Anthony Burns in 1854, the most famous fugitive slave controversy in US history; the Homestead strike/lockout of 1892; the quiz show scandal of the 1950s; and the student uprisings at Columbia University in 1968. Emphasis on finding ways to make sense of these events and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history.

Andrew Pope
Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Location
56+162
HASS
H
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.025J
11.472J

D-Lab: Development

Issues in international development, appropriate technology and project implementation addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with community organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an optional IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Recitation sections focus on specific project implementation, and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the target countries as well as an introduction to the local languages. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session. 

Libby Hsu
Fall
3-2-7
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 3:30 - 5:00PM (lecture)
F 3:30 - 5:00PM (lab)
Location
N51-310
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.029J
15.3791J
11.529J/15.379J

Mobility Ventures: Driving Innovation in Transportation Systems

This course is designed for students who aspire to shape the future of mobility. The course explores technological, behavioral, policy and systems-wide frameworks for innovation in transportation systems, complemented with case studies across the mobility spectrum, from autonomous vehicles to urban air mobility to last-mile sidewalk robots. Students will interact with a series of guest lecturers from CEOs and other business and government executives who are actively reshaping the future of mobility. Interdisciplinary teams of students will work to deliver business plans for startups or action plans for solving “real world” challenges in established companies, governments or NGOs.

John Moavenzadeh
Bill Aulet
Annie Hudson
Fall
3-3-6
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
Location
E25-117
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.041
11.401

Introduction to Housing, Community, and Economic Development

Provides a critical introduction to the shape and determinants of political, social, and economic inequality in America, with a focus on racial and economic justice. Explores the role of the city in visions of justice. Analyzes the historical, political, and institutional contexts of housing and community development policy in the US, including federalism, municipal fragmentation, and decentralized public financing. Introduces major dimensions in US housing policy, such as housing finance, public housing policy, and state and local housing affordability mechanisms. Reviews major themes in community economic development, including drivers of economic inequality, small business policy, employment policy, and cooperative economics. Expectations and evaluation criteria differ for students taking graduate version. 

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
TR 9:30 - 11:00AM
Location
9-451
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.074
11.274

Cybersecurity Clinic

Provides an opportunity for MIT students to become certified in methods of assessing the vulnerability of public agencies (particularly agencies that manage critical urban infrastructure) to the risk of cyberattack. Certification involves completing an 8-hour, self-paced, online set of four modules during the first four weeks of the semester followed by a competency exam. Students who successfully complete the exam become certified. The certified students work in teams with client agencies in various cities around the United States. Through preparatory interactions with the agencies, and short on-site visits, teams prepare vulnerability assessments that client agencies can use to secure the technical assistance and financial support they need to manage the risks of cyberattack they are facing. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Fall
2-4-6
Undergraduate
Schedule
F 10:00AM - 12:00PM
Location
9-450A
Restricted Elective
REST
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.100

Introduction to Computational Thinking in Cities

MIT students can major in Urban Science – a joint degree between Urban Planning and Computer Science – but what does Urban Science look like in the real world? The class introduces participants to the practice of Urban Science in the public sector, private sector and civil society. The seminar introduces students to the history of using computer science approaches in city planning and explores contemporary challenges of addressing complex, often political, unequal and ‘wicked’ planning challenges with new computational and data-analytic tools. It invites a series of practitioners from the field, who work with data analytic tools in the various areas of urban planning to MIT to present and debate their work, exploring how the emerging field of Urban Science is affecting and changing traditional planning practice. The class critically analyzes lectures from weekly “Cities and Technology” guest lectures, and students read and discuss materials related to the lectures and debates. 

 

The three-unit course offers requires a fairly light load—one hour of class time and up to two hours of preparation per week—and expects students to actively engage in presentation, discussion and debate. There are no exams, but students are asked to lead discussions about weekly guest lectures and deliver a final paper.

Fall
1-0-2
Undergraduate
Schedule
T 2:00 - 3:00PM
Location
10-401
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.107
11.407

Tools and Techniques for Inclusive Economic Development

This course engages economic development planning to understand and address historical economic exclusion and institutional oppression. Begins with 20th-century history and the origins of poverty first to enable students to understand why we must explicitly undertake actions to steer economic development purposefully. The task is to deploy the conventional tools of economic development planning to privilege steps leading to identifying and reducing inequality. This class includes core tools and techniques in economic development planning. Assignments will engage in data collection, analysis, and presentation, emphasizing underrepresented populations. We intend to expose inequities and consider actions that build healthy communities traditionally excluded from mainstream economic opportunities. We couple skills with interpretive intuitions to enable students to master the use of conventional tools and learn to apply them appropriately in specific settings. These are aggregated into a final report and include the tools developed over the semester. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Fall
2-1-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
M 9:00AM - 12:00PM
Location
9-450A
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.111

Leadership in Negotiation: Advanced Applications

Building on the skills and strategies honed in 11.011, explores advanced negotiation practice. Emphasizes an experiential skill-building approach, underpinned by cutting-edge cases and innovative research. Examines applications in high-stakes management, public policy, social entrepreneurship, international diplomacy, and scientific discovery. Strengthens collaborative decision-making, persuasion, and leadership skills by negotiating across different media and through personalized coaching, enhancing students' ability to proactively engage stakeholders, transform organizations, and inspire communities.

Enrollment limited by lottery; consult class website for information and deadlines.

Fall
4-0-8
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 10:00AM - 12:00PM
Location
9-255
Prerequisites
11.011 OR Permission of instructor
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.122
IDS.066J
11.422, 15.655, IDS.435

Law, Technology, and Public Policy

Examines how law, economics, and technological change shape public policy, and how law can sway technological change; how the legal system responds to environmental, safety, energy, social, and ethical problems; how law and markets interact to influence technological development; and how law can affect wealth distribution, employment, and social justice. Covers energy/climate change; genetic engineering; telecommunications and role of misinformation; industrial automation; effect of regulation on technological innovation; impacts of intellectual property law on innovation and equity; pharmaceuticals; nanotechnology; cost/benefit analysis as a decision tool; public participation in governmental decisions affecting science and technology; corporate influence on technology and welfare; and law and economics as competing paradigms to encourage sustainability. Students taking graduate version explore subject in greater depth. 

Nicholas Ashford
Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
TR 3:30 - 5:00PM
Location
E51-057
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.124J

Introduction to Education: Looking Forward & Looking Back on Education

One of two introductory subjects on teaching and learning science and mathematics in a variety of K-12 settings. Topics include education and media, education reform, the history of education, simulations, games, and the digital divide. Students gain practical experience through weekly visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and activities to develop a critical and broad understanding of past and current forces that shape the goals and processes of education, and explores the challenges and opportunities of teaching. Students work collaboratively and individually on papers, projects, and in-class presentations.

Eric Klopfer
Fall
3-6-3
Undergraduate
Schedule
TR 2:30 - 4:00PM
Location
56-154
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.138
11.458

Crowd Sourced City: Civic Tech Prototyping

Investigates the use of social medial and digital technologies for planning and advocacy by working with actual planning and advocacy organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate prototype digital tools. Students use the development of their digital tools as a way to investigate new media technologies that can be used for planning. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 9:30 - 11:00AM
Location
9-450
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.142
11.442

Geography of the Global Economy

Analyzes implications of economic globalization for communities, regions, international businesses and economic development organizations. Uses spatial analysis techniques to model the role of energy resources in shaping international political economy. Investigates key drivers of human, physical, and social capital flows and their roles in modern human settlement systems. Surveys contemporary models of industrialization and places them in geographic context. Connects forces of change with their implications for the distribution of wealth and human well-being. Look backward to understand pre-Covid conditions and then moves to the present to understand how a global pandemic changes the world we now live in. Class relies on current literature and explorations of sectors.

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
M 2:00 - 5:00PM
Location
9-450A
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.149
11.449

Decarbonizing Urban Mobility

Focuses on measuring and reducing emissions from passenger transportation. After examining travel, energy, and climate conditions, students review existing approaches to transport decarbonization. Evaluates new mobility technologies through their potential to contribute to (or delay) a zero emission mobility system. Students consider the policy tools required to achieve approaches to achieve change. Frames past and future emission reductions using an approach based on the Kata Identity, decomposing past (and potential future) emissions into their component pieces. Seeks to enable students to be intelligent evaluators of approaches to transportation decarbonization and equip them with the tools to develop and evaluate policy measures relevant to their local professional challenges. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Andrew Salzberg
Fall
3-3-6
Undergraduate
Location
9-451
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.152J
21H.385J

The Ghetto: From Venice to Harlem

Provides an in-depth look at a modern institution of oppression: the ghetto. Uses literature to examine ghettoization over time and across a wide geographical area, from Jews in Medieval Europe to African-Americans and Latinos in the 20th-century United States. Also explores segregation and poverty in the urban “Third World.”

Craig Steven Wilder
Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 3:30 - 5:00PM
Location
4-261
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.159
11.259

Entrepreneurial Negotiation

Combines online weekly face-to-face negotiation exercises and in-person lectures designed to empower budding entrepreneurs with negotiation techniques to protect and increase the value of their ideas, deal with ego and build trust in relationships, and navigate entrepreneurial bargaining under constraints of economic uncertainty and complex technical considerations. Students must complete scheduled weekly assignments, including feedback memos to counterpart negotiators, and meet on campus with the instructor to discuss and reflect on their experiences with the course. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

    Fall
    1-3-2
    Undergraduate
    Schedule
    F 12:00 - 1:00PM
    H1: meets 9/9 to 10/21
    Location
    9-255
    Can Be Repeated for Credit
    No
    11.164J
    17.391J
    11.497

    Human Rights at Home and Abroad

    Provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the history, foundation, structure, and operation of the human rights movement. Focuses on key ideas, actors, methods and sources, and critically evaluates the field. Addresses current debates in human rights, including the relationship with security, democracy, development and globalization, urbanization, equality (in housing and other economic and social rights; women's rights; ethnic, religious and racial discrimination; and policing/conflict), post-conflict rebuilding and transitional justice, and technology in human rights activism. No prior coursework needed, but work experience, or community service that demonstrates familiarity with global affairs or engagement with ethics and social justice issues, preferred. Students taking graduate version are expected to write a research paper.

    Fall
    2-0-10
    Undergraduate
    Schedule
    W 3:00 - 5:00PM
    Location
    9-450A
    Prerequisites
    Permission of Instructor
    HASS
    S
    Can Be Repeated for Credit
    No
    11.165J
    1.268J
    11.477

    Urban Energy Systems and Policy

    Examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions. Examines key issues in the current and future development of urban energy systems, such as technology, use, behavior, regulation, climate change, and lack of access or energy poverty. Case studies on a diverse sampling of cities explore how prospective technologies and policies can be implemented. Includes intensive group research projects, discussion, and debate.

      Fall
      3-0-9
      Undergraduate
      Schedule
      TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM
      Location
      9-451
      HASS
      S
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.173J
      1.103J
      11.273J, 1.303J

      Infrastructure Design for Climate Change

      In this team-oriented, project-based subject, students work to find technical solutions that could be implemented to mitigate the effects of natural hazards related to climate change, bearing in mind that any proposed measures must be appropriate in a given region's socio-political-economic context. Students are introduced to a variety of natural hazards and possible mitigation approaches as well as principles of design, including adaptable design and design for failure. Students select the problems they want to solve and develop their projects. During the term, officials and practicing engineers of Cambridge, Boston, Puerto Rico, and MIT Facilities describe their approaches. Student projects are documented in a written report and oral presentation. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

      H. Einstein
      Fall
      0-2-4
      Undergraduate
      Schedule
      TR 1:00 - 2:00PM
      Location
      1-371
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.188
      11.205

      Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS Laboratory

      An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a tool for visualizing and analyzing spatial data. Explores how GIS can make maps, guide decisions, answer questions, and advocate for change. Class builds toward a project in which students critically apply GIS techniques to an area of interest. Students build data discovery, cartography, and spatial analysis skills while learning to reflect on their positionality within the research design process. Because maps and data are never neutral, the class incorporates discussions of power, ethics, and data throughout as part of a reflective practice. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided.

      Fall
      3-3-6
      Undergraduate
      Schedule
      MW 2:30 - 4:00PM (lecture)
      F 1:00 - 4:00PM (lab)
      Location
      9-354 (lecture)
      9-554 (lab)
      Restricted Elective
      INSTITUTE LAB
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.200

      Gateway: Urban Studies and Planning 1

      Introduces the theory and practice of planning and urban studies through exploration of the history of the field, case studies, and criticisms of traditional practice.

      Fall
      4-1-7
      Graduate
      Schedule
      MW 11:00 - 12:30PM
      F 3:30 - 4:30PM (R1)
      F 2:30 - 3:30PM (R2)
      R 2:30 - 3:30PM (R3)
      Location
      37-212 (lecture)
      9-450 (R1)
      9-450 (R2)
      9-450A (R3)
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.205
      11.188

      Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS Laboratory

      An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): a tool for visualizing and analyzing data representing locations and their attributes. GIS is invaluable for planners, scholars, and professionals who shape cities and a political instrument with which activists advocate for change. Class includes exercises to make maps, query databases, and analyze spatial data. Because maps and data are never neutral, the class incorporates discussions of power, ethics, and data throughout as part of a reflective practice.

      Fall
      2-2-2
      Graduate
      Schedule
      MW 2:30 - 4:00PM (Lecture)
      MTR 4:30 - 6:30PM (Recitation Sessions)
      H1: Ends 10/21
      Location
      9-354 (Lecture)
      9-554 (Recitation Sessions)
      Preference Given To
      first-year MCP students
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.220

      Quantitative Reasoning and Statistical Methods for Planning I

      Develops logical, empirically based arguments using statistical techniques and analytic methods. covers elementary statistics, probability, and other types of quantitative reasoning useful for description, estimation, comparison, and explanation. Emphasis on the use and limitations of analytical techniques in planning practice. Restricted to first-year MCP students. Students are required to attend one of the three scheduled recitation sections.

      Fall
      4-2-6
      Graduate
      Schedule
      TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM
      R 4:30 - 5:30PM (R1)
      F 1:30 - 2:30PM (R2)
      R 3:30 - 4:30PM (R3)
      Location
      9-255 (lecture)
      9-450A (R1)
      9-450 (R2)
      9-450A (R3)
      Prerequisites
      Restricted to first-year MCP students or Permission of instructor
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.233

      Research Design for Policy Analysis and Planning

      Develops skills in research design for policy analysis and planning. Emphasizes the logic of the research process and its constituent elements. Topics include philosophy of science, question formulation, hypothesis generation and theory construction, data collection techniques (e.g. experimental, survey, interview), ethical issues in research, and research proposal preparation. 

      Faizan Siddiqi
      Fall
      3-0-9
      Graduate
      Schedule
      T 9:30AM - 12:30PM
      Location
      9-450
      Prerequisites
      Permission of Instructor
      Open Only To
      PhD students in course 11
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.236

      Participatory Action Research

      Introduces students to participatory action research (PAR), an approach to research and inquiry that enables communities to examine and address consequential societal problems. Explores theoretical and practical questions at the heart of partnerships between applied social scientists and community partners. Focus includes the history of PAR and action research; debates regarding PAR as a form of applied social science; and practical, political, and ethical questions in the practice of PAR. Guides students through an iterative process for developing their own personal theories of practice. Covers co-designing and co-conducting research with community partners at various stages of the research process; examination of actual cases in which PAR-like methods have been used with greater or lesser success; and interaction with community members, organizations, and individuals who have been involved in PAR collaborations.

      Fall
      3-0-9
      Graduate
      Schedule
      R 9:00AM - 12:00PM
      Location
      9-450
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.250

      Transportation Research Design

      Seminar dissects ten transportation studies from head to toe to illustrate how research ideas are initiated, framed, analyzed, evidenced, written, presented, criticized, revised, extended, and published, quoted and applied. Students design and execute their own transportation research.

      Enrollment limited and permission required from the instructor. If interested, please email Prof. Jinhua Zhao (jinhua@mit.edu) your CV and a brief description of your research interest and motivation to join the class

      Fall
      2-0-1
      Graduate
      Schedule
      F 9:30 - 11:00AM
      Location
      9-451
      Prerequisites
      Permission of Instructor
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.251

      Frontier of Transportation Research

      Survey of the latest transportation research offered by 12 MIT faculty each presenting their ongoing research. Students are required to attend the classes, read the assigned articles, and write a brief reflection memo.  

        Fall
        1-0-2
        Graduate
        Schedule
        F 12:00 - 1:00PM
        Location
        9-451
        Can Be Repeated for Credit
        No
        11.259
        11.159

        Entrepreneurial Negotiation

        Combines online weekly face-to-face negotiation exercises and in-person lectures designed to empower budding entrepreneurs with negotiation techniques to protect and increase the value of their ideas, deal with ego and build trust in relationships, and navigate entrepreneurial bargaining under constraints of economic uncertainty and complex technical considerations. Students must complete scheduled weekly assignments, including feedback memos to counterpart negotiators, and meet on campus with the instructor to discuss and reflect on their experiences with the course. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

        Fall
        1-3-2
        Graduate
        Schedule
        F 12:00 - 1:00PM
        H1: meets 9/9 to 10/21
        Location
        9-255
        Can Be Repeated for Credit
        No
        11.273J
        1.303J
        11.173J, 1.103J

        Infrastructure Design for Climate Change

        In this team-oriented, project-based subject, students work to find technical solutions that could be implemented to mitigate the effects of natural hazards related to climate change, bearing in mind that any proposed measures must be appropriate in a given region's socio-political-economic context. Students are introduced to a variety of natural hazards and possible mitigation approaches as well as principles of design, including adaptable design and design for failure. Students select the problems they want to solve and develop their projects. During the term, officials and practicing engineers of Cambridge, Boston, Puerto Rico, and MIT Facilities describe their approaches. Student projects are documented in a written report and oral presentation. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

        H. Einstein
        Fall
        0-2-4
        Graduate
        Schedule
        TR 1:00 - 2:00PM
        Location
        1-371
        Can Be Repeated for Credit
        No
        11.301J / 4.252J

        Introduction to Urban Design and Development

        Cancelled

        Addresses the field of urban design, how cities have developed, the relationship of urban design to society, and how cities are being designed and developed around the world. Comprised of four units providing insights on how history and theory of city design has evolved in contemporary cities. Each unit contains lectures by instructors, presentations by outside experts, sets of readings, and discussion sections. Structured to integrate self-paced learning and interactive discussions to permit collective reflections on how key ideas and practices are relevant to pressing challenges today like climate change, racial equity, and pandemic. Issues and projects under investigation vary in scale and are demonstrated by concepts and practices that matter at US and international level. Intended for graduate students in city planning, architecture, urban design, real estate, business, and other fields seeking an introduction to fundamental knowledge of theory and praxis in city design and development. Course is also open to advanced undergraduates who have completed 11.001j/4.250j and who have permission of instructor.

          Fall
          3-0-9
          Graduate
          Schedule
          TR 9:30 - 11:00AM
          Location
          9-354
          Can Be Repeated for Credit
          No
          11.305

          Doing Good by Doing Well: Planning and Development Case Studies that Promote both the Public Good and Real Estate Value

          Seminar studies how the messy and complex forces of politics, planning and the real estate market have collectively shaped Boston's urban fabric and skyline in the last two decades. Using some of the city's most important real estate development proposals as case studies, students dissect and analyze Boston's negotiated development review and permitting process to understand what it takes beyond a great development concept and a sound financial pro forma to earn community and political support. Throughout the term, students identify strategies for success and pitfalls for failure within this intricate approval process, as well as how these lessons can be generalized and applied to other cities and real estate markets.

            Fall
            2-0-1
            Graduate
            Schedule
            W 2:30 - 4:30PM
            Location
            9-451
            Can Be Repeated for Credit
            No
            11.308J
            4.213J

            Ecological Urbanism Seminar

            Ecological Urbanism weds the theory and practice of city design and planning, as a means of adaptation, with the insights of ecology and other environmental disciplines. Ecological urbanism is critical to the future of the city and its design: it provides a framework for addressing challenges that threaten humanity, such as climate change, rising sea level, and environmental and social justice, while fulfilling human needs for health, safety, and welfare, meaning and delight. The class applies an historical and theoretical perspective to the solution of real world challenges.

            PRACTICUM 

              Fall
              3-0-9
              Graduate
              Schedule
              M 2:00 - 5:00PM
              Location
              10-401
              Prerequisites
              Permission of Instructor
              Can Be Repeated for Credit
              No
              11.313

              Advanced Research Workshop in Landscape and Urbanism

              In-depth research workshop on pressing socio-economic and environmental design issue of our time, includes discussion and practices with real-world stakeholders experimenting with new development typologies and technologies. The goal is to generate well-grounded, design-based solutions and landscape infrastructural responses to the physical design problem being addressed. 

              PRACTICUM 

              Fall
              3-0-9
              Graduate
              Schedule
              R 2:00 - 5:00PM
              Location
              10-485
              Prerequisites
              Permission of Instructor
              Can Be Repeated for Credit
              No
              11.328J

              Urban Design Skills: Observing, Interpreting, and Representing the City

              Introduces methods for observing, interpreting, and representing the urban environment. Students draw on their senses and develop their ability to deduce, question, and test conclusions about how the built environment is designed, used, and valued. The interrelationship of built form, circulation networks, open space, and natural systems are a key focus. Supplements existing classes that cover theory and history of city design and urban planning and prepares students without design backgrounds with the fundamentals of physical planning. Intended as a foundation for 11.329.

              Fall
              4-2-2
              Graduate
              Schedule
              F 9:00AM - 1:00PM (Lecture)
              W 5:00 - 7:30PM (Recitation)
              H1: Ends 10/21
              Location
              10-485 (Lecture)
              9-554 (Recitation)
              Can Be Repeated for Credit
              No
              11.329J

              Advanced Urban Design Skills: Observing, Interpreting, and Representing the City

              Through a studio-based course in planning and urban design, builds on the foundation acquired in 11.328 to engage in creative exploration of how design contributes to resilient, just, and vibrant urban places. Through the planning and design of two projects, students creatively explore spatial ideas and utilize various digital techniques to communicate their design concepts, giving form to strategic thinking. Develops approaches and techniques to evaluate the plural structure of the built environment and offer propositions that address policies and regulations as well as the values, behaviors, and wishes of the different users.

                Fall
                4-2-4
                Graduate
                Schedule
                F 9:00AM - 1:00PM (Lecture)
                W 5:00 - 7:30PM (Recitation)
                H2: Begins 10/26
                Location
                10-485 (Lecture)
                9-554 (Recitation)
                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                No
                11.338

                Urban Design Studio: Smart Villages of Italy

                Examines the rehabilitation and re-imagination of a city, region, or territory. Analyzes human settlement at multiple scales: regional, citywide, neighborhood, and individual dwellings. Aims to shape innovative design solutions, enhance social amenity, and improve economic equity through strategic and creative geographical, urban design and architectural thinking. Intended for students with backgrounds in architecture, community development, urban design, and physical planning.

                 

                PRACTICUM 

                  Fall
                  3-0-9
                  Graduate
                  Schedule
                  F 2:00 - 5:00PM
                  Location
                  10-401
                  Prerequisites
                  11.328 OR Permission of instructor
                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                  No
                  11.345J
                  1.462J

                  Entrepreneurship in the Built Environment

                  Introduction to entrepreneurship and how it shapes the world we live in. Through experiential learning in a workshop setting, students start to develop entrepreneurial mindset and skills. Through a series of workshops, student are introduced to the concept of Venture Design to create new venture proposals for the built environment as a method to understand the role of the entrepreneur in the fields of design, planning, real estate, and other related industries.

                  Svafa Gronfeldt
                  Gilad Rosenzweig
                  Fall
                  2-0-4
                  Graduate
                  Schedule
                  W 9:00 - 11:00AM
                  H1: Ends 10/21
                  Location
                  9-451
                  Prerequisites
                  Permission of Instructor
                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                  No
                  11.371J
                  1.818J, 2.65J, 10.391J, 22.811J
                  2.650J, 10.291J, 22.081J

                  Sustainable Energy

                  Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various energy technologies in each fuel cycle stage for fossil (oil, gas, synthetic), nuclear (fission and fusion) and renewable (solar, biomass, wind, hydro, and geothermal) energy types, along with storage, transmission, and conservation issues. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context.

                    Michael Golay
                    Fall
                    3-1-8
                    Graduate
                    Schedule
                    TR 3:30 - 5:00PM (Lecture)
                    Location
                    32-155 (Lecture)
                    24-121 (Recitation)
                    Can Be Repeated for Credit
                    No
                    11.373J
                    12.885J
                    12.385

                    Science, Politics, and Environmental Policy

                    Examines the role of science in US and international environmental policymaking. Surveys the methods by which scientists learn about the natural world; the treatment of science by experts, advocates, the media, and the public and the way science is used in legislative, administrative and judicial decision making. Through lectures, group discussions, and written essays, students develop a critical understanding of the role of science in environmental policy. Potential case studies include fisheries management, ozone depletion, global warming, smog, and endangered species.

                      Susan Solomon
                      Fall
                      3-0-6
                      Graduate
                      Schedule
                      F 1:00 - 4:00PM
                      Location
                      5-217
                      Can Be Repeated for Credit
                      No
                      11.401
                      11.041

                      Introduction to Housing, Community, and Economic Development

                      Provides a critical introduction to the shape and determinants of political, social, and economic inequality in America, with a focus on racial and economic justice. Explores the role of the city in visions of justice. Analyzes the historical, political, and institutional contexts of housing and community development policy in the US, including federalism, municipal fragmentation, and decentralized public financing. Introduces major dimensions in US housing policy, such as housing finance, public housing policy, and state and local housing affordability mechanisms. Reviews major themes in community economic development, including drivers of economic inequality, small business policy, employment policy, and cooperative economics. Expectations and evaluation criteria differ for students taking graduate version. 

                      Fall
                      3-0-9
                      Graduate
                      Schedule
                      TR 9:30 - 11:00AM
                      Location
                      9-451
                      Can Be Repeated for Credit
                      No
                      11.407
                      11.107

                      Tools and Techniques for Inclusive Economic Development

                      Introduces tools and techniques in economic development planning. Extensive use of data collection, analysis, and display techniques. Students build interpretive intuition skills through user experience design activities and develop a series of memos summarizing the results of their data analysis. These are aggregated into a final report, and include the tools developed over the semester. Students taking graduate version complete modified assignments focused on developing computer applications. 

                      Fall
                      3-0-9
                      Graduate
                      Schedule
                      M 9:00AM - 12:00PM
                      Location
                      9-450A
                      Can Be Repeated for Credit
                      No
                      11.409

                      The Institutions of Modern Capitalism: States and Markets

                      Investigates the relationship between states and markets in the evolution of modern capitalism. Critically assesses the rise of what Karl Polanyi and Albert Hirschman have referred to as "market society:" a powerful conceptual framework that views the development of modern capitalism not as an outcome of deterministic economic and technological forces, but rather as the result of contingent social and political processes. Exposes students to a range of conceptual tools and analytic frameworks through which to understand the politics of economic governance and to consider the extent to which societal actors can challenge its limits and imagine alternative possibilities. Sub-themes vary from year to year and have focused on racial capitalism, markets and morality, urban futures, and the global financial crisis.

                        Fall
                        2-0-10
                        Graduate
                        Schedule
                        T 2:00 - 4:00PM
                        Location
                        5-232
                        Can Be Repeated for Credit
                        No
                        11.422
                        15.655J, IDS.435J
                        11.122J, IDS.066J

                        Law, Technology, and Public Policy

                        Examines how law, economics, and technological change shape public policy, and how law can sway technological change; how the legal system responds to environmental, safety, energy, social, and ethical problems; how law and markets interact to influence technological development; and how law can affect wealth distribution, employment, and social justice. Covers energy/climate change; genetic engineering; telecommunications and the role of misinformation; industrial automation; effect of regulation on technological innovation; impacts of intellectual property law on innovation and equity; pharmaceuticals; nanotechnology; cost/benefit analysis as a decision tool; public participation in governmental decisions affecting science and technology; corporate influence on technology and welfare; and law and economics as competing paradigms to encourage sustainability. Students taking graduate version explore subject in greater depth. 

                        Nicholas Ashford
                        Fall
                        3-0-9
                        Graduate
                        Schedule
                        TR 3:30 - 5:00PM
                        Location
                        E51-057
                        Can Be Repeated for Credit
                        No
                        11.430

                        Leadership in Real Estate

                        Designed to help students deepen their understanding of leadership and increase self-awareness. They reflect on their authentic leadership styles and create goals and a learning plan to develop their capabilities. They also participate in activities to strengthen their "leadership presence" - the ability to authentically connect with people's hearts and minds. Students converse with classmates and industry leaders to learn from their insights, experiences, and advice.

                        Gloria Schuck
                        Fall
                        3-0-3
                        Graduate
                        Schedule
                        W 9:00AM - 12:00PM
                        H1: Ends 10/21
                        Location
                        9-357
                        Can Be Repeated for Credit
                        No
                        11.431

                        Real Estate Finance & Investment

                        Concepts and techniques for analyzing financial decisions in commercial property development and investment. Topics include property income streams, urban economics, discounted cash flow, equity valuation, leverage and income tax considerations, development projects, and joint ventures.

                          David Geltner
                          Fall
                          4-0-8
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          MW 12:30 - 2:00PM (Lecture)
                          M 4:30 - 6:30PM (Recitation)
                          Location
                          9-354
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.433J

                          Real Estate Economics

                          Develops an understanding of the fundamental economic factors that shape the market for real property, as well as the influence of capital markets in asset pricing. Analyzes of housing as well as commercial real estate. Covers demographic analysis, regional growth, construction cycles, urban land markets, and location theory as well as recent technology impacts. Exercises and modeling techniques for measuring and predicting property demand, supply, vacancy, rents, and prices.

                            Fall
                            4-0-8
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            TR 12:30 - 2:00PM (Lecture)
                            W 5:00 - 6:30PM (Recitation)
                            Location
                            9-354
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.439

                            Revitalizing Urban Main Streets

                            Workshop explores the integration of economic development and physical planning interventions to revitalize urban commercial districts. Covers: an overview of the causes of urban business district decline, revitalization challenges, and the strategies to address them; the planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from both physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. Students apply the theories, tools and interventions discussed in class to preparing a formal neighborhood commercial revitalization plan for a client business district.

                            PRACTICUM 

                              Fall
                              4-0-11
                              Graduate
                              Schedule
                              TR 2:30 - 4:30PM
                              Location
                              9-217
                              Prerequisites
                              Permission of Instructor
                              Can Be Repeated for Credit
                              No
                              11.442
                              11.142

                              Geography of the Global Economy

                              Analyzes implications of economic globalization for communities, regions, international businesses and economic development organizations. Uses spatial analysis techniques to model the role of energy resources in shaping international political economy. Investigates key drivers of human, physical, and social capital flows and their roles in modern human settlement systems. Surveys contemporary models of industrialization and places them in geographic context. Connects forces of change with their implications for the distribution of wealth and human well-being. Look backward to understand pre-Covid conditions and then moves to the present to understand how a global pandemic changes the world we now live in. Class relies on current literature and explorations of sectors.

                              Fall
                              3-0-9
                              Graduate
                              Schedule
                              M 2:00 - 5:00PM
                              Location
                              9-450A
                              Can Be Repeated for Credit
                              No
                              11.450

                              Real Estate Development Building Systems

                              Provides students with a concise overview of the range of building systems that are encountered in professional commercial real estate development practice in the USA. Focuses on the relationship between real estate product types, building systems, and the factors that real estate development professionals must consider when evaluating these products and systems for a specific development project. Surveys commercial building technology including Foundation, Structural, MEP/FP, Envelope, and Interiors systems and analyzes the factors that lead development professionals to select specific systems for specific product types. One or more field trips to active construction sites may be scheduled during non-class hours based on student availability. 

                              Y. Tipsis
                              Fall
                              2-0-1
                              Graduate
                              Schedule
                              R 3:00 - 5:00PM
                              H1: Ends 10/21
                              Location
                              9-354
                              Can Be Repeated for Credit
                              No
                              11.458
                              11.138

                              Crowd Sourced City: Civic Tech Prototyping

                              Investigates the use of social medial and digital technologies for planning and advocacy by working with actual planning and advocacy organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate prototype digital tools. Students use the development of their digital tools as a way to investigate new media technologies that can be used for planning. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

                              Fall
                              3-0-9
                              Graduate
                              Schedule
                              MW 9:30 - 11:00AM
                              Location
                              9-450
                              Can Be Repeated for Credit
                              No
                              11.466J
                              1.813J, 15.657J, IDS.437J

                              Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development

                              Investigates sustainable development, taking a broad view to include not only a healthy economic base, but also a sound environment, stable employment, adequate purchasing power, distributional equity, national self-reliance, and maintenance of cultural integrity. Explores national, multinational, and international political and legal mechanisms to further sustainable development through transformation of the industrial state. Addresses the importance of technological innovation and the financial crisis of 2008.

                              Nicholas Ashford
                              Fall
                              3-0-9
                              Graduate
                              Schedule
                              W 4:00 - 6:30PM
                              Location
                              E51-376
                              Can Be Repeated for Credit
                              No
                              11.472
                              11.025/EC.701/EC.781

                              D-Lab: Development

                              Issues in international development, appropriate technology and project implementation addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with community organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an optional IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Recitation sections focus on specific project implementation, and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the target countries as well as an introduction to the local languages. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session. 

                              Libby Hsu
                              Fall
                              3-2-7
                              Graduate
                              Schedule
                              MW 3:30 - 5:00PM (lecture)
                              F 3:30 - 5:00PM (lab)
                              Location
                              N51-310
                              Can Be Repeated for Credit
                              No
                              11.477
                              11.165J, 1.286J

                              Urban Energy Systems and Policy

                              Examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions. Examines key issues in the current and future development of urban energy systems, such as technology, use, behavior, regulation, climate change, and lack of access or energy poverty. Case studies on a diverse sampling of cities explore how prospective technologies and policies can be implemented. Includes intensive group research projects, discussion, and debate.

                              Fall
                              3-0-9
                              Graduate
                              Schedule
                              TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM
                              Location
                              9-451
                              Can Be Repeated for Credit
                              No
                              11.485

                              Southern Urbanisms

                              Guides students in examining implicit and explicit values of diversity offered in "Southern" knowledge bases, theories, and practices of urban production. With a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa, considers why the South-centered location of the estimated global urban population boom obligates us to examine how cities work as they do, and why Western-informed urban theory and planning scholarship may be ill-suited to provide guidance on urban development there. Examines the "rise of the rest" and its implications for the making and remaking of expertise and norms in planning practice. Students engage with seminal texts from leading authors of Southern urbanism and critical themes, including the rise of Southern theory, African urbanism, Chinese international cooperation, Brazilian urban diplomacy, and the globally-driven commodification of urban real estate.

                                Fall
                                2-0-10
                                Graduate
                                Schedule
                                F 10:00AM - 12:00PM
                                Location
                                9-217
                                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                No
                                11.497
                                11.164J, 17.391J

                                Human Rights at Home and Abroad

                                Provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the history, foundation, structure, and operation of the human rights movement. Focuses on key ideas, actors, methods and sources, and critically evaluates the field. Addresses current debates in human rights, including the relationship with security, democracy, development and globalization, urbanization, equality (in housing and other economic and social rights; women's rights; ethnic, religious and racial discrimination; and policing/conflict), post-conflict rebuilding and transitional justice, and technology in human rights activism. No prior coursework needed, but work experience, or community service that demonstrates familiarity with global affairs or engagement with ethics and social justice issues, preferred. Students taking graduate version are expected to write a research paper.

                                Fall
                                2-0-10
                                Graduate
                                Schedule
                                W 3:00 - 5:00PM
                                Location
                                9-450A
                                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                No
                                11.520

                                Workshop on Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

                                Includes spatial analysis exercises using real-world data sets, building toward an independent project in which students critically apply GIS techniques to an area of interest. Students build data discovery, cartography, and spatial analysis skills while learning to reflect on power and positionality within the research design process. Tailored to GIS applications within planning and design and emphasizes the role of reflective practice in GIS.

                                Fall
                                2-2-2
                                Graduate
                                Schedule
                                MW 2:30 - 4:00PM (Lecture)
                                MTR 4:30 - 6:30PM (Recitation Sessions)
                                H2: Begins 10/24
                                Location
                                9-354 (Lecture)
                                9-554 (Recitation Sessions)
                                Prerequisites
                                11.205 or permission of instructor
                                Preference Given To
                                MCP students
                                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                No
                                11.529J
                                15.379J
                                11.029[J], 15.3791[J]

                                Mobility Ventures: Driving Innovation in Transportation Systems

                                This course is designed for students who aspire to shape the future of mobility. The course explores technological, behavioral, policy and systems-wide frameworks for innovation in transportation systems, complemented with case studies across the mobility spectrum, from autonomous vehicles to urban air mobility to last-mile sidewalk robots. Students will interact with a series of guest lecturers from CEOs and other business and government executives who are actively reshaping the future of mobility. Interdisciplinary teams of students will work to deliver business plans for startups or action plans for solving “real world” challenges in established companies, governments or NGOs.

                                John Moavenzadeh
                                Bill Aulet
                                Annie Hudson
                                Fall
                                3-3-6
                                Graduate
                                Schedule
                                MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
                                Location
                                E25-117
                                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                No
                                11.540

                                Urban Transportation Planning and Policy

                                Examines transportation policymaking and planning, its relationship to social and environmental justice and the influences of politics, governance structures and human and institutional behavior. Explores the pathway to infrastructure, how attitudes are influenced, and how change happens. Examines the tensions and potential synergies among traditional transportation policy values of individual mobility, system efficiency and “sustainability”. Explores the roles of the government; analysis of current trends; transport sector decarbonization; land use, placemaking, and sustainable mobility networks; the role of “mobility as a service”, and the implications of disruptive technology on personal mobility. Assesses traditional planning methods with a critical eye, and through that process consider how to approach transportation planning in a way that responds to contemporary needs and values, with an emphasis on transport justice.

                                Fall
                                3-0-9
                                Graduate
                                Schedule
                                F 2:00 - 5:00PM
                                Location
                                9-451
                                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                No
                                11.601

                                Theory and Practice of Environmental Planning

                                This class is open to all graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) at MIT, Wellesley, or Harvard interested in environmental justice, environmental ethics, the tools of environmental analysis, and strategies for collaborative decision-making. The primary objective of the class is to help each student formulate a personal theory of environmental planning practice appropriate to achieving the implementation of environmental justice and sustainable development goals.

                                The course is taught comparatively, with numerous references to examples from around the world. The course has four parts: Environmental Justice and Environmental Policy-Making, Environmental Ethics and Environmental Policy Debates, Inherent Bias and Environmental Planning Techniques, and Public Participation including Difficult Conversations.

                                This is a required subject for students who might want to pursue the Environmental Planning Certificate in the School of Architecture and Planning.

                                Fall
                                3-0-9
                                Graduate
                                Schedule
                                TR 3:00 - 4:30PM
                                Location
                                9-451
                                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                No
                                11.701

                                International Development Planning: Foundations

                                Offers a survey of the histories and theories of international development, and the main debates about the role of key actors and institutions in development. Includes a focus on the impact of colonialism, the main theoretical approaches that have influenced the study and practice of development, as well as the role of actors such as States, markets and civil society in development. Focuses on the interactions between interventions and institutions at different scales, from local, national and global/transnational. Offers an opportunity to develop a focus on selected current topics in development planning, such as migration, displacement, participatory planning, urban-rural linkages, corruption, legal institutions and post-conflict development.

                                Fall
                                3-0-9
                                Graduate
                                Schedule
                                TR 2:30 - 4:00PM
                                Location
                                9-450
                                Prerequisites
                                Restricted to first-year MCP and SPURS students
                                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                No
                                11.912

                                Advanced Urbanism Colloquium

                                Introduces principal issues in the field of advanced urbanism for discussion and exploration. Includes theoretical linkages between ideas about the culture of cities, processes of urbanization, and urban design. Involves events co-organized by faculty and doctoral students to further engage and inform research. 

                                  Fall
                                  1-1-1
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  W 1:00 - 2:30PM
                                  Location
                                  E14-140L
                                  Prerequisites
                                  Preference to doctoral students in the Advanced Urbanism concentration
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.920

                                  Planning in Practice

                                  Familiarizes students with the practice of planning, by requiring actual experience in professional internship placements. Enables students to both apply what they are learning in their classes in an actual professional setting and to reflect, using a variety of platforms, on the learning personal and professional - growing out of their internship experience. Through readings, practical experience and reflection, empirical observation, and contact with practitioners, students gain deeper general understanding of the practice of the profession and enhanced understanding of the intersection of structural racism and planning. 

                                  Fall
                                  Arranged
                                  Undergraduate/Graduate
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.930

                                  Advanced Seminar on Planning Theory

                                  Introduces students to key debates in the field of planning theory, drawing on historical development of the field of urban/regional/national planning from 1900 to 2020 in both the US and in newly industrializing countries. Class objectives are for students to develop their own theory of action as they become sensitized to issues of racial and gender discrimination in city building, and understand how planning styles are influenced by a range of issues, including the challenge of ethical practice.

                                  Fall
                                  2-0-10
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  T 2:00 - 5:00PM
                                  Location
                                  9-450A
                                  Prerequisites
                                  Preference given to first year PhD students but will be open to continuing PhD Students and second year Master’s students
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S03

                                  Transportation Shaping Sustainable Urbanization: Connections with Behavior, Urban Economics and Planning

                                  Explores changes in the built environment expected from transportation investments, and how they can be used to promote sustainable and equitable cities. Reflects on how notable characteristics of cities can be explained by their historical and current transportation features. From a historical perspective, e.g., discusses how central areas of most European cities created during the pre-modern transportation era are more walkable, dense, and diverse; and the auto-oriented North American suburbs sprawling during the massive increase in car ownership. Introduces theoretical basis and empirical evidence to analyze the urban transformation autonomous vehicles will bring and how shared mobility services affect travel behavior, and its implications from an urban planning perspective. Lectures interspersed with guest speakers and an optional field trip. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students.

                                  Adriano Borges Ferreira Da Costa
                                  Fall
                                  2-0-1
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM
                                  H1 9/13 - 10/6 (8 meetings)
                                  Location
                                  9-217
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S187

                                  Undergraduate Planning Seminar

                                  A weekly seminar that includes discussions on topics in Urban Planning. Topics will include a range of efforts, initiatives, and problems related to: housing and neighborhood change; politics, science, and the climate crisis; transportation and technology; design and the future of cities; racial and economic justice; art and public engagement strategies; urban development and city growth; and the ins and outs of being a working planner in an imperfect world...!  Light reading each week and/or alternate materials: podcasts, online videos, news coverage, events/lecture series, etc.  (We also hope to have a wide range of guest speakers, including DUSP faculty and alums.)

                                  Fall
                                  3-0-3
                                  Undergraduate
                                  Schedule
                                  R 3:30 - 5:00PM
                                  Location
                                  5-231
                                  Preference Given To
                                  DUSP Sophomores and Juniors
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S945

                                  Teaching Critical Geospatial Data Literacy

                                  Students in this course will partner with pK-12 educators in the Boston Public Schools and the Leventhal Maps and Education Center at the Boston Public Library to develop an innovative urban data literacy curriculum for young learners. Our goals will be to 1) make mapping and data storytelling accessible for young learners and their teachers; and 2) develop an approachable set of materials that guide students and teachers through critical questions of power and ethics as they relate to data collection and visualization.

                                  Despite the many successes of the ‘open data’ movement, a large gap remains between ‘availability’ and ‘accessibility’, in terms of both technical competencies and institutional capacity. Despite the availability of unprecedented volumes of geospatial data and the software necessary to analyze and visualize the same, these remain largely inaccessible to non-specialist users. Both educators and industry are beginning to recognize the importance of addressing this gap, leading to a range of efforts to bring mapping and open data into pK-12 curricula. However, these initiatives predominantly depend on demanding, proprietary software that will generally be unavailable to students when they lose their school affiliation. Furthermore, these materials rarely engage with questions of ethics and politics that are necessary to prepare students for a data-saturated media ecosystem characterized by disinformation and the abuse of personal data. 

                                  This practicum will confront these twinned problems – accessibility and ethics – by developing reusable, modular curricula and virtual teaching materials. These materials will seek to build teacher capacity, support place-based education, and build critical data literacy among young learners.

                                  PRACTICUM 

                                  Fall
                                  Schedule
                                  F 1:00 - 4:00PM
                                  Location
                                  9-217
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S950

                                  Infrastructure Equity Research

                                  This limited enrollment seminar engages students in preparing for their own grounded research projects around “equity” in the infrastructure space. It helps students prepare for grounded field-research domestically or internationally by first introducing students to different analytical constructs of equity (and debates therein) within published empirical research and in political philosophy and theory; and second, guiding them in their consideration of similar analytical constructs within their own infrastructure-related research development and realization.

                                  Fall
                                  2-0-1
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  F 2:00 - 3:00PM
                                  Location
                                  9-450A
                                  Prerequisites
                                  Permission of Instructor
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S965
                                  11.S966

                                  Mixed Income Housing Development

                                  Leslie Reed
                                  Will Monson
                                  Fall
                                  2-0-1
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  TR 2:30 - 4:00PM
                                  Location
                                  9-354
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S966
                                  11.S965

                                  Mixed Income Housing Development

                                  Leslie Reid
                                  Will Monson
                                  Fall
                                  3-0-3
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  TR 2:30 - 4:00PM
                                  Location
                                  9-354
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S967

                                  Laws of the Land: Environmental and Land Use Laws

                                  Examines the intersection of environmental law with property and land use laws, and how they relate to environmental protection and climate change. It begins with a brief introduction to the U.S. legal system.  It explores the legal process of land transfer and the legal structure of development rights and the regulation of land use in the United States.  It introduces the bases for constitutional challenges to land use regulations and how courts consider claims arising from constitutional protections regarding takings, substantive and procedural due-process, equal protection, and freedom of expression, highlighting the intersection of land use law with climate change.  The course also introduces students to the broad dimensions of federal environmental statutes relevant to land use, including the National Environmental Policy Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, among others.  It concludes by discussing state and local efforts to address climate change through land use regulation.

                                   

                                  Fall
                                  3-0-3
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  TR 2:00 - 3:30PM
                                  Location
                                  26-142
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S968

                                  Real Estate Private Equity

                                  This course is intended for any student interested in a career in private market investing. Specifically, we will cover topics pertaining to investing, managing, and developing investments in real estate and private asset backed companies. The course will be divided into three modules. The first module will focus on portfolio construction and understanding investment risks associated with private investments. The second module consists of the analysis of specific transactions with an emphasis on whether to pursue a specific transaction or not based on its investment merits. This section of the course will be run as an investment committee. We will focus on the attributes of both successful and unsuccessful transactions. The final module consists of a focus on private investment firms, their compensation structures and how they impact behavior. Students will be asked to develop an investment concept and present it via a paper and investment proposal. Industry leaders will judge the final presentations.

                                  Nori Gerardo Lietz
                                  Fall
                                  3-0-9
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM (Lecture)
                                  T 4:00 - 5:00PM (Recitation)
                                  Location
                                  3-133
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.S970

                                  Corporate Real Estate

                                  Sarah Abrams
                                  Fall
                                  2-0-1
                                  Graduate
                                  Schedule
                                  MW 9:30 - 11:00AM
                                  H2
                                  Location
                                  9-354
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No
                                  11.ThG

                                  Graduate Thesis

                                  Program of research and writing of thesis; to be arranged by the student with supervising committee.

                                  Fall
                                  Arranged
                                  Graduate
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  Yes
                                  11.THTJ
                                  4.ThTJ

                                  Thesis Research Design Seminar

                                  Designed for students writing a thesis in Urban Studies and Planning or Architecture. Develop research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, and draft introductory and methodology sections.

                                  Fall
                                  3-0-9
                                  Undergraduate
                                  Schedule
                                  W 12:30 - 3:00PM
                                  Location
                                  9-217
                                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                                  No