Subjects

The Department offers many subjects for undergraduates and graduates alike. These are broken down into core, specialized and research subjects. Each year the Department offers 25 undergraduate and more than 90 graduate subjects of instruction from which each student designs, with faculty guidance, an individual program of study that matches their interests and experiences. 

The materials of many of the classes developed by DUSP faculty are provided free to the public through MIT's Open CourseWare site. In addition, DUSP is continuing to develop online offerings on multiple platforms, including: EdXMITxPro, and the MIT Case Study Initiative.

Conflict Chart

Filter by
Semester
Level
Type
11.002J
17.30J

Making Public Policy

Examines how the struggle among competing advocates shapes the outputs of government. Considers how conditions become problems for government to solve, why some political arguments are more persuasive than others, why some policy tools are preferred over others, and whether policies achieve their goals. Investigates the interactions among elected officials, think tanks, interest groups, the media, and the public in controversies over global warming, urban sprawl, Social Security, health care, education, and other issues. 

Fall
4-0-8
Undergraduate
Schedule
TR 1:00 - 2:30PM (lecture)
R 7:00 - 8:00PM (R1)
R 8:00 - 9:00PM (R2)
F 10:00 - 11:00AM (R3)
F 11:00AM - 12:00PM (R4)
F 12:00 - 1:00 PM (R5)
F 1:00 - 2:00 PM (R6)
Location
4-270 (Lecture)
9-450 (Recitation Sessions 1-6)
HASS
CI
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.006
11.206

Poverty and Economic Security

Explores the evolution of poverty and economic security in the US within a global context. Examines the impacts of recent economic restructuring and globalization. Reviews current debates about the fate of the middle class, sources of increasing inequality, and approaches to advancing economic opportunity and security. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
R 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Location
1-135
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.008

Undergraduate Planning Seminar

A weekly seminar that includes discussions on topics in cities and urban planning, including guest lectures from DUSP faculty and practicing planners.  Topics include urban science, zoning, architecture and urban design, urban sociology, politics and public policy, transportation and mobility, democratic governance, civil rights and social justice, urban economics, affordable housing, environmental policy and planning, real estate and economic development, agriculture and food policy, public health, and international development.  Weekly student presentations on local planning issues and current events; occasional walking tours or arranged field trips.

Preference given to Course 11 and 11-6 sophomores and juniors.

Fall
2-0-4
Undergraduate
Schedule
T 3:30 - 5:00PM
Location
10-401
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.011

The Art and Science of Negotiation

Introduction to negotiation theory and practice. Applications in government, business, and nonprofit settings are examined. Combines a "hands-on" personal skill-building orientation with a look at pertinent tactical and strategic foundations. Preparation insights, persuasion tools, ethical benchmarks, and institutional influences are examined as they shape our ability to analyze problems, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes in social, organizational, and political circumstances characterized by interdependent interests. Enrollment limited by lottery; consult class website for information and deadlines. 

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 2:00 - 3:30PM
Location
9-255
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.025J
11.472J

D-Lab: Development

Issues in international development, appropriate technology and project implementation addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with community organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an optional IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Recitation sections focus on specific project implementation, and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the target countries as well as an introduction to the local languages. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session. 

Libby Hsu
Fall
3-2-7
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 3:30 - 5:00PM (lecture)
F 3:30 - 5:00PM (lab)
Location
N51-310
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.029J
15.3791J
11.529J/15.379J

Mobility Ventures: Driving Innovation in Transportation Systems

This course is designed for students who aspire to shape the future of mobility. The course explores technological, behavioral, policy and systems-wide frameworks for innovation in transportation systems, complemented with case studies across the mobility spectrum, from autonomous vehicles to urban air mobility to last-mile sidewalk robots. Students will interact with a series of guest lecturers from CEOs and other business and government executives who are actively reshaping the future of mobility. Interdisciplinary teams of students will work to deliver business plans for startups or action plans for solving “real world” challenges in established companies, governments or NGOs.

John Moavenzadeh
Jenny Larios Berlin
Fall
3-3-6
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
Location
E25-117
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.041
11.401

Introduction to Housing, Community, and Economic Development

Provides a critical introduction to the shape and determinants of political, social, and economic inequality in America, with a focus on racial and economic justice. Explores the role of the city in visions of justice. Analyzes the historical, political, and institutional contexts of housing and community development policy in the US, including federalism, municipal fragmentation, and decentralized public financing. Introduces major dimensions in US housing policy, such as housing finance, public housing policy, and state and local housing affordability mechanisms. Reviews major themes in community economic development, including drivers of economic inequality, small business policy, employment policy, and cooperative economics. Expectations and evaluation criteria differ for students taking graduate version. 

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
TR 9:30 - 11:00AM
Location
9-451
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.074
11.274

Cybersecurity Clinic

Provides an opportunity for MIT students to become certified in methods of assessing the vulnerability of public agencies (particularly agencies that manage critical urban infrastructure) to the risk of cyberattack. Certification involves completing an 8-hour, self-paced, online set of four modules during the first four weeks of the semester followed by a competency exam. Students who successfully complete the exam become certified. The certified students work in teams with client agencies in various cities around the United States. Through preparatory interactions with the agencies, and short on-site visits, teams prepare vulnerability assessments that client agencies can use to secure the technical assistance and financial support they need to manage the risks of cyberattack they are facing. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Fall
2-4-6
Undergraduate
Schedule
F 10:00AM - 12:00PM
Location
9-450A
Restricted Elective
REST
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.092
11.592

Renewable Energy Facility Siting Clinic

Presents methods for resolving facility siting disputes, particularly those involving renewable energy. After completing four modules and a competency exam for MITx certification, students work in teams to help client communities in various cities around the United States. Through direct interactions with the proponents and opponents of facilities subject to local opposition, students complete a stakeholder assessment and offer joint fact-finding and collaborative problem-solving assistance. The political, legal, financial, and regulatory aspects of facility siting, particularly for renewable energy, are reviewed along with key infrastructure planning principles. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

Fall
2-4-6
Undergraduate
Schedule
F 3:00 - 5:00 PM
Location
9-450A
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.107
11.407

Tools and Techniques for Inclusive Economic Development

This course engages economic development planning to understand and address historical economic exclusion and institutional oppression. Begins with 20th-century history and the origins of poverty first to enable students to understand why we must explicitly undertake actions to steer economic development purposefully. The task is to deploy the conventional tools of economic development planning to privilege steps leading to identifying and reducing inequality. This class includes core tools and techniques in economic development planning. Assignments will engage in data collection, analysis, and presentation, emphasizing underrepresented populations. We intend to expose inequities and consider actions that build healthy communities traditionally excluded from mainstream economic opportunities. We couple skills with interpretive intuitions to enable students to master the use of conventional tools and learn to apply them appropriately in specific settings. These are aggregated into a final report and include the tools developed over the semester. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 2:00 - 3:30 PM
Location
9-450A
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.111

Leadership in Negotiation: Advanced Applications

Building on the skills and strategies honed in 11.011, explores advanced negotiation practice. Emphasizes an experiential skill-building approach, underpinned by cutting-edge cases and innovative research. Examines applications in high-stakes management, public policy, social entrepreneurship, international diplomacy, and scientific discovery. Strengthens collaborative decision-making, persuasion, and leadership skills by negotiating across different media and through personalized coaching, enhancing students' ability to proactively engage stakeholders, transform organizations, and inspire communities.

Enrollment limited by lottery; consult class website for information and deadlines.

Fall
4-0-8
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 10:00AM - 12:00PM
Location
9-255
Prerequisites
11.011 OR Permission of instructor
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.122
IDS.066J
11.422, 15.655, IDS.435

Law, Technology, and Public Policy

Examines how law, economics, and technological change shape public policy, and how law can sway technological change; how the legal system responds to environmental, safety, energy, social, and ethical problems; how law and markets interact to influence technological development; and how law can affect wealth distribution, employment, and social justice. Covers energy/climate change; genetic engineering; telecommunications and role of misinformation; industrial automation; effect of regulation on technological innovation; impacts of intellectual property law on innovation and equity; pharmaceuticals; nanotechnology; cost/benefit analysis as a decision tool; public participation in governmental decisions affecting science and technology; corporate influence on technology and welfare; and law and economics as competing paradigms to encourage sustainability. Students taking graduate version explore subject in greater depth. 

Nicholas Ashford
Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
TR 3:30 - 5:00PM
Location
E51-057
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.124J

Introduction to Education: Looking Forward & Looking Back on Education

One of two introductory subjects on teaching and learning science and mathematics in a variety of K-12 settings. Topics include education and media, education reform, the history of education, simulations, games, and the digital divide. Students gain practical experience through weekly visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and activities to develop a critical and broad understanding of past and current forces that shape the goals and processes of education, and explores the challenges and opportunities of teaching. Students work collaboratively and individually on papers, projects, and in-class presentations.

Eric Klopfer
Fall
3-6-3
Undergraduate
Schedule
TR 2:30 - 4:00PM
Location
56-154
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.129
CMS.591

Educational Theory and Practice I

Concentrates on core set of skills and knowledge necessary for teaching in secondary schools. Topics include classroom management, student behavior and motivation, curriculum design, educational reform, and the teaching profession. Classroom observation is a key component. Assignments include readings from educational literature, written reflections on classroom observations, practice teaching and constructing curriculum. The first of the three-course sequence necessary to complete the Teacher Education Program.

G. Schwanbeck
Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
TR 4:00 - 5:30PM
Location
56-154
Prerequisites
Co-req: CMS.586
HASS
S
Preference Given To
juniors and seniors
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.138
11.458

Crowd Sourced City: Civic Tech Prototyping

Investigates the use of social medial and digital technologies for planning and advocacy by working with actual planning and advocacy organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate prototype digital tools. Students use the development of their digital tools as a way to investigate new media technologies that can be used for planning. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 2:00 - 3:30 PM
Location
10-485
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.158
11.478

Behavioral Science, A.I. and Urban Mobility

Integrates behavioral science, artificial intelligence and transportation technology to shape travel behavior, design mobility systems and business, and reform transportation policies. Introduces methods to sense travel behavior with new technology and measurements; nudge behavior through perception and preference shaping; design mobility systems and ventures that integrate autonomous vehicles, shared mobility, and public transit; and regulate travel with behavior-sensitive transport policies. Challenges students to pilot behavioral experiments and design creative mobility systems, business and policies.

Fall
3-0-9
Undergraduate
Schedule
MW 9:30 - 11:00 AM
Location
4-149
HASS
S
Can Be Repeated for Credit
No
11.159
11.259

Entrepreneurial Negotiation

Combines online weekly face-to-face negotiation exercises and in-person lectures designed to empower budding entrepreneurs with negotiation techniques to protect and increase the value of their ideas, deal with ego and build trust in relationships, and navigate entrepreneurial bargaining under constraints of economic uncertainty and complex technical considerations. This course also explores artificial intelligence (AI) interfaces in negotiation, by having the students experience what it is like to prepare for a negotiation using AI, negotiating with an AI bot, and receiving feedback from the AI after the negotiation. Students must complete scheduled weekly assignments, including feedback memos to counterpart negotiators, and meet on campus with the instructor to discuss and reflect on their experiences with the course. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Graduate students and Sloan Fellows - please register 11.259

    Samuel Dinnar
    Fall
    1-3-2
    Undergraduate
    Schedule
    F 12:00 - 1:00PM
    H1
    Location
    9-255
    Can Be Repeated for Credit
    No
    11.165
    1.268
    11.477

    Urban Energy Systems and Policy

    Examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions. Examines key issues in the current and future development of urban energy systems, such as technology, use, behavior, regulation, climate change, and lack of access or energy poverty. Case studies on a diverse sampling of cities explore how prospective technologies and policies can be implemented. Includes intensive group research projects, discussion, and debate.

      Fall
      3-0-9
      Undergraduate
      Schedule
      TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM
      Location
      9-451
      HASS
      S
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.173J
      1.103J
      11.273J, 1.303J

      Infrastructure Design for Climate Change

      In this team-oriented, project-based subject, students work to find technical solutions that could be implemented to mitigate the effects of natural hazards related to climate change, bearing in mind that any proposed measures must be appropriate in a given region's socio-political-economic context. Students are introduced to a variety of natural hazards and possible mitigation approaches as well as principles of design, including adaptable design and design for failure. Students select the problems they want to solve and develop their projects. During the term, officials and practicing engineers of Cambridge, Boston, Puerto Rico, and MIT Facilities describe their approaches. Student projects are documented in a written report and oral presentation. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

      H. Einstein
      Fall
      0-2-4
      Undergraduate
      Schedule
      TR 1:00 - 2:00PM
      Location
      1-371
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.188
      11.205

      Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS Laboratory

      An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a tool for visualizing and analyzing spatial data. Explores how GIS can make maps, guide decisions, answer questions, and advocate for change. Class builds toward a project in which students critically apply GIS techniques to an area of interest. Students build data discovery, cartography, and spatial analysis skills while learning to reflect on their positionality within the research design process. Because maps and data are never neutral, the class incorporates discussions of power, ethics, and data throughout as part of a reflective practice. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided.

      Fall
      3-3-6
      Undergraduate
      Schedule
      MW 2:30 - 4:00PM (lecture)
      F 1:00 - 4:00PM (lab)
      Location
      9-354 (lecture)
      9-554 (lab)
      Restricted Elective
      INSTITUTE LAB
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.200

      Gateway: Urban Studies and Planning 1

      Introduces the theory and practice of planning and urban studies through exploration of the history of the field, case studies, and criticisms of traditional practice.

      Fall
      4-1-7
      Graduate
      Schedule
      MW 11:00 - 12:30PM
      R 2:30 - 3:30PM (R1)
      R 4:30 - 4:30PM (R2)
      F 2:30 - 3:30PM (R3)
      Location
      37-212 (lecture)
      9-450 (R1-3)
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.202

      Planning Economics

      Students use economic theory tools acquired in 11.203 to understand the mutual processes of individual action and structural constraint and investigate crises in search of opportunities for mitigation and reparation. Investigates a variety of structural crises from throughout the realms of planning, such as: capitalism, climate change, and (in)action; white supremacy, segregation, and gentrification; colonialism, informality, and infrastructure; autocentricity and other legacies of the built environment.

      Fall
      3-0-3
      Graduate
      Schedule
      TR 11:00 - 12:30PM, H2
      R1: Thursday 3:30 - 4:30 PM, 9-450
      R2: Friday 1:00 - 2:00 PM, 9-450A
      Location
      E25-111
      R1: 9-450
      R2: 9-450A
      Prerequisites
      11.203
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.203

      Microeconomics

      Students develop a suite of tools from economic theory to understand the mutual processes of individual action and structural constraint. Students apply these tools to human interaction and social decision-making. Builds an understanding of producer theory from the collaborative possibilities and physical constraints that unfold as production is scaled up. Presents consumer theory as the process of individuals doing the best for themselves, their families, and their communities -- subject to the sociostructural constraints under which they operate. Considers alternative frameworks of social welfare, with a specific focus on marginalization and crisis, as well as common policy interventions and their implications under different constructions of welfare.

      Fall
      3-0-3
      Graduate
      Schedule
      TR 11:00 - 12:30PM, H1
      R1: Thursday 3:30 - 4:30 PM, 9-450
      R2: Friday 1:00 - 2:00 PM, 9-450A
      Location
      9-255
      R1: 9-450
      R2: 9-450A
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.205
      11.188

      Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS Laboratory

      An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): a tool for visualizing and analyzing data representing locations and their attributes. GIS is invaluable for planners, scholars, and professionals who shape cities and a political instrument with which activists advocate for change. Class includes exercises to make maps, query databases, and analyze spatial data. Because maps and data are never neutral, the class incorporates discussions of power, ethics, and data throughout as part of a reflective practice.

      Fall
      2-2-2
      Graduate
      Schedule
      MW 2:30 - 4:00PM (Lecture)
      M 4:30 - 6:30PM (Lab 1)
      T 4:30 - 6:30 PM (Lab 2)
      R 4:30 - 6:30 PM (Lab 3)
      H1
      Location
      9-354 (Lecture)
      9-554 (Lab Sessions)
      Preference Given To
      first-year MCP students
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.206
      11.006

      Poverty and Economic Security

      Explores the evolution of poverty and economic security in the US within a global context. Examines the impacts of recent economic restructuring and globalization. Reviews current debates about the fate of the middle class, sources of increasing inequality, and approaches to advancing economic opportunity and security. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

      Fall
      3-0-9
      Graduate
      Schedule
      R 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
      Location
      1-135
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.233

      Research Design for Policy Analysis and Planning

      Develops skills in research design for policy analysis and planning. Emphasizes the logic of the research process and its constituent elements. Topics include philosophy of science, question formulation, hypothesis generation and theory construction, data collection techniques (e.g. experimental, survey, interview), ethical issues in research, and research proposal preparation. 

      Fall
      3-0-9
      Graduate
      Schedule
      T 9:30AM - 12:30PM
      Location
      9-450
      Prerequisites
      Permission of Instructor
      Open Only To
      PhD students in course 11
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.236

      Participatory Action Research

      Introduces students to participatory action research (PAR), an approach to research and inquiry that enables communities to examine and address consequential societal problems. Explores theoretical and practical questions at the heart of partnerships between applied social scientists and community partners. Focus includes the history of PAR and action research; debates regarding PAR as a form of applied social science; and practical, political, and ethical questions in the practice of PAR. Guides students through an iterative process for developing their own personal theories of practice. Covers co-designing and co-conducting research with community partners at various stages of the research process; examination of actual cases in which PAR-like methods have been used with greater or lesser success; and interaction with community members, organizations, and individuals who have been involved in PAR collaborations.

      Fall
      3-0-9
      Graduate
      Schedule
      TR 3:30 - 5:00 PM
      Location
      9-450A
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.238

      Ethics of Intervention

      An historical and cross-cultural study of the logics and practices of intervention: the ways that individuals, institutions, and governments identify conditions of need or states of emergency within and across borders that require a response. Examines when a response is viewed as obligatory, when is it deemed unnecessary, and by whom; when the intercession is considered fulfilled; and the rationales or assumptions that are employed in assessing interventions. Theories of the state, globalization, and humanitarianism; power, policy, and institutions; gender, race, and ethnicity; and law, ethics, and morality are examined.

      Fall
      3-0-9
      Graduate
      Schedule
      T 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
      Location
      10-485
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.250

      Transportation Research Design

      Seminar dissects ten transportation studies from head to toe to illustrate how research ideas are initiated, framed, analyzed, evidenced, written, presented, criticized, revised, extended, and published, quoted and applied. Students design and execute their own transportation research.

      Enrollment limited and permission required from the instructor. If interested, please email Prof. Jinhua Zhao (jinhua@mit.edu) your CV and a brief description of your research interest and motivation to join the class

      Fall
      2-0-1
      Graduate
      Schedule
      F 9:30 - 11:00AM
      Location
      9-451
      Prerequisites
      Permission of Instructor
      Can Be Repeated for Credit
      No
      11.251

      Frontier of Transportation Research

      Survey of the latest transportation research offered by 12 MIT faculty each presenting their ongoing research. Students are required to attend the classes, read the assigned articles, and write a brief reflection memo.  

        Fall
        1-0-2
        Graduate
        Schedule
        F 12:00 - 1:00PM
        Location
        9-451
        Can Be Repeated for Credit
        No
        11.258

        Sustainable Urbanization Research Seminar

        Reviews the seminal as well as latest research on the driving forces of urbanization, real estate markets, urban sustainability in both developed and developing economies. Examines the tensions as well as synergies between urbanization and sustainability, and designs and evaluates policies and business strategies that can enhance the synergies while reduce the tensions. Covers various research topics under the umbrella of urbanization under three modules (sustainable urbanization; sustainable real estate; urbanization in emerging economies) where students study the initiation of an idea to its publication, including but not limited to, analyzing, framing, writing and critiquing as parts of the process. Sessions are organized as a semi-structured dialogue.

        Fall
        2-0-1
        Graduate
        Schedule
        M 12:30 - 2:00 PM
        Location
        9-451
        Can Be Repeated for Credit
        Yes
        11.259
        11.159

        Entrepreneurial Negotiation

        Combines online weekly face-to-face negotiation exercises and in-person lectures designed to empower budding entrepreneurs with negotiation techniques to protect and increase the value of their ideas, deal with ego and build trust in relationships, and navigate entrepreneurial bargaining under constraints of economic uncertainty and complex technical considerations. This course also explores artificial intelligence (AI) interfaces in negotiation, by having the students experience what it is like to prepare for a negotiation using AI, negotiating with an AI bot, and receiving feedback from the AI after the negotiation. Students must complete scheduled weekly assignments, including feedback memos to counterpart negotiators, and meet on campus with the instructor to discuss and reflect on their experiences with the course. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Graduate students and Sloan Fellows - please register 11.259

        Samuel Dinnar
        Fall
        1-3-2
        Graduate
        Schedule
        F 12:00 - 1:00PM
        H1
        Location
        9-255
        Can Be Repeated for Credit
        No
        11.273J
        1.303J
        11.173J, 1.103J

        Infrastructure Design for Climate Change

        In this team-oriented, project-based subject, students work to find technical solutions that could be implemented to mitigate the effects of natural hazards related to climate change, bearing in mind that any proposed measures must be appropriate in a given region's socio-political-economic context. Students are introduced to a variety of natural hazards and possible mitigation approaches as well as principles of design, including adaptable design and design for failure. Students select the problems they want to solve and develop their projects. During the term, officials and practicing engineers of Cambridge, Boston, Puerto Rico, and MIT Facilities describe their approaches. Student projects are documented in a written report and oral presentation. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

        H. Einstein
        Fall
        0-2-4
        Graduate
        Schedule
        TR 1:00 - 2:00PM
        Location
        1-371
        Can Be Repeated for Credit
        No
        11.274
        11.074

        Cybersecurity Clinic

        Provides an opportunity for MIT students to become certified in methods of assessing the vulnerability of public agencies (particularly agencies that manage critical urban infrastructure) to the risk of cyberattack. Certification involves completing an 8-hour, self-paced, online set of four modules during the first four weeks of the semester followed by a competency exam. Students who successfully complete the exam become certified. The certified students work in teams with client agencies in various cities around the United States. Through preparatory interactions with the agencies, and short on-site visits, teams prepare vulnerability assessments that client agencies can use to secure the technical assistance and financial support they need to manage the risks of cyberattack they are facing. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

        Fall
        2-4-6
        Graduate
        Schedule
        F 10:00AM - 12:00PM
        Location
        9-450A
        Restricted Elective
        REST
        Can Be Repeated for Credit
        No
        11.305

        Doing Good by Doing Well: Planning and Development Case Studies that Promote both the Public Good and Real Estate Value

        Seminar studies how the messy and complex forces of politics, planning and the real estate market have collectively shaped Boston's urban fabric and skyline in the last two decades. Using some of the city's most important real estate development proposals as case studies, students dissect and analyze Boston's negotiated development review and permitting process to understand what it takes beyond a great development concept and a sound financial pro forma to earn community and political support. Throughout the term, students identify strategies for success and pitfalls for failure within this intricate approval process, as well as how these lessons can be generalized and applied to other cities and real estate markets.

          Fall
          2-0-1
          Graduate
          Schedule
          W 2:30 - 4:30PM
          Location
          9-451
          Can Be Repeated for Credit
          No
          11.325

          Technological Change & Innovation for Real Estate and Cities

          Seeks to examine the technological change and innovation that is disrupting the foundation of how we create the built environment. Through a series of educational workshops, students scout, catalog, and track technologies by looking at new real estate uses, products, processes, and organizational strategies at MIT labs and around the globe. Participants contribute to an interactive web tool, "The Tech Tracker," which provides technology intelligence to students and real estate professionals to enhance their understanding of technological progress. 

          Fall
          2-0-4
          Graduate
          Schedule
          T 2:30 - 4:30 PM
          H2
          Location
          9-217
          Can Be Repeated for Credit
          No
          11.328
          4.240

          Urban Design Skills: Observing, Interpreting, and Representing the City

          Introduces methods for observing, interpreting, and representing the urban environment. Students draw on their senses and develop their ability to deduce, question, and test conclusions about how the built environment is designed, used, and valued. The interrelationship of built form, circulation networks, open space, and natural systems are a key focus. Supplements existing classes that cover theory and history of city design and urban planning and prepares students without design backgrounds with the fundamentals of physical planning. Intended as a foundation for 11.329.

          Fall
          4-2-2
          Graduate
          Schedule
          F 9:00AM - 1:00PM (Lecture)
          W 5:00 - 7:30PM (Recitation)
          H1
          Location
          10-485
          Can Be Repeated for Credit
          No
          11.329
          4.248

          Advanced Urban Design Skills: Observing, Interpreting, and Representing the City

          Through a studio-based course in planning and urban design, builds on the foundation acquired in 11.328 to engage in creative exploration of how design contributes to resilient, just, and vibrant urban places. Through the planning and design of two projects, students creatively explore spatial ideas and utilize various digital techniques to communicate their design concepts, giving form to strategic thinking. Develops approaches and techniques to evaluate the plural structure of the built environment and offer propositions that address policies and regulations as well as the values, behaviors, and wishes of the different users.

            Fall
            4-2-4
            Graduate
            Schedule
            F 9:00AM - 1:00PM (Lecture)
            W 5:00 - 7:30PM (Recitation)
            H2
            Location
            10-485
            Can Be Repeated for Credit
            No
            11.332
            4.163

            Urban Design Studio

            The design of urban environments. Strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development. Involves architecture and planning students in joint work; requires individual designs or design and planning guidelines.

            Rafi Segal
            Fall
            arranged
            Graduate
            Schedule
            TR 1:00 - 6:00 PM
            Location
            10-485 classroom
            studio space in 7-434
            Can Be Repeated for Credit
            No
            11.345J
            1.462J

            Entrepreneurship in the Built Environment

            Introduction to entrepreneurship and how it shapes the world we live in. Through experiential learning in a workshop setting, students start to develop entrepreneurial mindset and skills. Through a series of workshops, student are introduced to the concept of Venture Design to create new venture proposals for the built environment as a method to understand the role of the entrepreneur in the fields of design, planning, real estate, and other related industries.

            Svafa Gronfeldt
            Gilad Rosenzweig
            Fall
            2-0-4
            Graduate
            Schedule
            W 9:00 - 11:00AM
            H1
            Location
            9-451
            Prerequisites
            Permission of Instructor
            Can Be Repeated for Credit
            No
            11.351

            Real Estate Ventures I: Negotiating Development-Phase Agreements

            Focuses on key business and legal issues within the principal agreements used to control, entitle, capitalize, and construct a mixed-use real estate development. Through the lens of the real estate developer and its counter-parties, students identify, discuss, and negotiate the most important business issues in right of entry, purchase and sale, development, and joint-venture agreements, as well as a construction contract and construction loan agreement. Students work closely with attorneys who specialize in the construction of such agreements and with students from area law schools and Columbia University and New York University. Enrollment limited to approximately 25; preference to MSRED students. No listeners. 

            W. T. McGrath
            Fall
            3-0-9
            Graduate
            Schedule
            R 6:00 - 9:00 PM
            Location
            9-354
            Can Be Repeated for Credit
            No
            11.360

            Community Growth and Land Use Planning

            Seminar, workshops, and fieldwork on strategies to use municipal land use regulations to shape urban growth and equity. Practicum workshop builds skills in civic engagement, policy-relevant research, zoning regulations, and physical design and planning. The workshop begins with implementation of qualitative and quantitative research into the existing built environment, social, economic, and political context. It continues with the planning, design, and implementation of community engagement strategies to shape goals and vision for the projects. The practicum then explores land use scenarios, design and innovative zoning and regulatory techniques, to improve equity in the areas of housing, environment, economic development, mobility, and the public realm. Projects arranged with small teams serving municipal clients experiencing pressures of urban growth and change in Massachusetts. Preference to MCP second year students.

            Fall
            3-0-9
            Graduate
            Schedule
            TR 2:00 - 3:30 PM
            Location
            10-401
            Can Be Repeated for Credit
            No
            11.371J
            1.818J, 2.65J, 10.391J, 22.811J
            2.650J, 10.291J, 22.081J

            Sustainable Energy

            Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various energy technologies in each fuel cycle stage for fossil (oil, gas, synthetic), nuclear (fission and fusion) and renewable (solar, biomass, wind, hydro, and geothermal) energy types, along with storage, transmission, and conservation issues. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context.

              Michael Golay
              Fall
              3-1-8
              Graduate
              Schedule
              TR 3:30 - 5:00PM (Lecture)
              F 4:00 - 5:00 PM (Recitation
              Location
              32-155 (Lecture)
              32-144 (Recitation)
              Can Be Repeated for Credit
              No
              11.373J
              12.885J
              12.385

              Science, Politics, and Environmental Policy

              Examines the role of science in US and international environmental policymaking. Surveys the methods by which scientists learn about the natural world; the treatment of science by experts, advocates, the media, and the public and the way science is used in legislative, administrative and judicial decision making. Through lectures, group discussions, and written essays, students develop a critical understanding of the role of science in environmental policy. Potential case studies include fisheries management, ozone depletion, global warming, smog, and endangered species.

                Susan Solomon
                Fall
                3-0-6
                Graduate
                Schedule
                F 2:00 - 5:00PM
                Location
                14E-310
                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                No
                11.401
                11.041

                Introduction to Housing, Community, and Economic Development

                Provides a critical introduction to the shape and determinants of political, social, and economic inequality in America, with a focus on racial and economic justice. Explores the role of the city in visions of justice. Analyzes the historical, political, and institutional contexts of housing and community development policy in the US, including federalism, municipal fragmentation, and decentralized public financing. Introduces major dimensions in US housing policy, such as housing finance, public housing policy, and state and local housing affordability mechanisms. Reviews major themes in community economic development, including drivers of economic inequality, small business policy, employment policy, and cooperative economics. Expectations and evaluation criteria differ for students taking graduate version. 

                Fall
                3-0-9
                Graduate
                Schedule
                TR 9:30 - 11:00AM
                Location
                9-451
                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                No
                11.407
                11.107

                Tools and Techniques for Inclusive Economic Development

                Introduces tools and techniques in economic development planning. Extensive use of data collection, analysis, and display techniques. Students build interpretive intuition skills through user experience design activities and develop a series of memos summarizing the results of their data analysis. These are aggregated into a final report, and include the tools developed over the semester. Students taking graduate version complete modified assignments focused on developing computer applications. 

                Fall
                3-0-9
                Graduate
                Schedule
                MW 2:00 - 3:30 PM
                Location
                9-450A
                Can Be Repeated for Credit
                No
                11.409

                The Institutions of Modern Capitalism: States and Markets

                Investigates the relationship between states and markets in the evolution of modern capitalism. Critically assesses the rise of what Karl Polanyi and Albert Hirschman have referred to as "market society:" a powerful conceptual framework that views the development of modern capitalism not as an outcome of deterministic economic and technological forces, but rather as the result of contingent social and political processes. Exposes students to a range of conceptual tools and analytic frameworks through which to understand the politics of economic governance and to consider the extent to which societal actors can challenge its limits and imagine alternative possibilities. Sub-themes vary from year to year and have focused on racial capitalism, markets and morality, urban futures, and the global financial crisis.

                  Fall
                  2-0-10
                  Graduate
                  Schedule
                  T 2:00 - 4:00PM
                  Location
                  9-451
                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                  No
                  11.422
                  15.655J, IDS.435J
                  11.122J, IDS.066J

                  Law, Technology, and Public Policy

                  Examines how law, economics, and technological change shape public policy, and how law can sway technological change; how the legal system responds to environmental, safety, energy, social, and ethical problems; how law and markets interact to influence technological development; and how law can affect wealth distribution, employment, and social justice. Covers energy/climate change; genetic engineering; telecommunications and the role of misinformation; industrial automation; effect of regulation on technological innovation; impacts of intellectual property law on innovation and equity; pharmaceuticals; nanotechnology; cost/benefit analysis as a decision tool; public participation in governmental decisions affecting science and technology; corporate influence on technology and welfare; and law and economics as competing paradigms to encourage sustainability. Students taking graduate version explore subject in greater depth. 

                  Nicholas Ashford
                  Fall
                  3-0-9
                  Graduate
                  Schedule
                  TR 3:30 - 5:00PM
                  Location
                  E51-057
                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                  No
                  11.430

                  Leadership in Real Estate

                  Designed to help students deepen their understanding of leadership and increase self-awareness. They reflect on their authentic leadership styles and create goals and a learning plan to develop their capabilities. They also participate in activities to strengthen their "leadership presence" - the ability to authentically connect with people's hearts and minds. Students converse with classmates and industry leaders to learn from their insights, experiences, and advice.

                  Gloria Schuck
                  Fall
                  3-0-3
                  Graduate
                  Schedule
                  M 9:00AM - 12:00PM
                  H1
                  Location
                  9-357
                  Can Be Repeated for Credit
                  No
                  11.431

                  Real Estate Finance & Investment

                  Concepts and techniques for analyzing financial decisions in commercial property development and investment. Topics include property income streams, urban economics, discounted cash flow, equity valuation, leverage and income tax considerations, development projects, and joint ventures.

                    W. Torous
                    Fall
                    4-0-8
                    Graduate
                    Schedule
                    MW 1:00 - 2:30PM (Lecture)
                    M 4:00 - 6:00PM (Recitation)
                    Location
                    9-354
                    Can Be Repeated for Credit
                    No
                    11.433J

                    Real Estate Economics

                    Develops an understanding of the fundamental economic factors that shape the market for real property, as well as the influence of capital markets in asset pricing. Analyzes of housing as well as commercial real estate. Covers demographic analysis, regional growth, construction cycles, urban land markets, and location theory as well as recent technology impacts. Exercises and modeling techniques for measuring and predicting property demand, supply, vacancy, rents, and prices.

                      Fall
                      4-0-8
                      Graduate
                      Schedule
                      TR 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Lecture)
                      W 5:00 - 6:30PM (Recitation)
                      Location
                      9-354
                      Can Be Repeated for Credit
                      No
                      11.450

                      Real Estate Development Building Systems

                      Provides students with a concise overview of the range of building systems that are encountered in professional commercial real estate development practice in the USA. Focuses on the relationship between real estate product types, building systems, and the factors that real estate development professionals must consider when evaluating these products and systems for a specific development project. Surveys commercial building technology including Foundation, Structural, MEP/FP, Envelope, and Interiors systems and analyzes the factors that lead development professionals to select specific systems for specific product types. One or more field trips to active construction sites may be scheduled during non-class hours based on student availability. 

                      Y. Tipsis
                      Fall
                      2-0-1
                      Graduate
                      Schedule
                      R 3:00 - 5:00PM
                      H1
                      Location
                      9-354
                      Can Be Repeated for Credit
                      No
                      11.458
                      11.138

                      Crowd Sourced City: Civic Tech Prototyping

                      Investigates the use of social medial and digital technologies for planning and advocacy by working with actual planning and advocacy organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate prototype digital tools. Students use the development of their digital tools as a way to investigate new media technologies that can be used for planning. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

                      Fall
                      3-0-9
                      Graduate
                      Schedule
                      MW 2:00 - 3:30 PM
                      Location
                      10-485
                      Can Be Repeated for Credit
                      No
                      11.466J
                      1.813J, 15.657J, IDS.437J

                      Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development

                      Investigates sustainable development, taking a broad view to include not only a healthy economic base, but also a sound environment, stable employment, adequate purchasing power, distributional equity, national self-reliance, and maintenance of cultural integrity. Explores national, multinational, and international political and legal mechanisms to further sustainable development through transformation of the industrial state. Addresses the importance of technological innovation and the financial crisis of 2008.

                      Nicholas Ashford
                      Fall
                      3-0-9
                      Graduate
                      Schedule
                      W 4:00 - 6:30PM
                      Location
                      E51-376
                      Can Be Repeated for Credit
                      No
                      11.472
                      11.025/EC.701/EC.781

                      D-Lab: Development

                      Issues in international development, appropriate technology and project implementation addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with community organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an optional IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Recitation sections focus on specific project implementation, and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the target countries as well as an introduction to the local languages. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session. 

                      Libby Hsu
                      Fall
                      3-2-7
                      Graduate
                      Schedule
                      MW 3:30 - 5:00PM (lecture)
                      F 3:30 - 5:00PM (lab)
                      Location
                      N51-310
                      Can Be Repeated for Credit
                      No
                      11.477
                      1.268
                      11.165

                      Urban Energy Systems and Policy

                      Examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions. Examines key issues in the current and future development of urban energy systems, such as technology, use, behavior, regulation, climate change, and lack of access or energy poverty. Case studies on a diverse sampling of cities explore how prospective technologies and policies can be implemented. Includes intensive group research projects, discussion, and debate.

                        Fall
                        3-0-9
                        Graduate
                        Schedule
                        TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM
                        Location
                        9-451
                        HASS
                        S
                        Can Be Repeated for Credit
                        No
                        11.478
                        11.158

                        Behavioral Science, A.I. and Urban Mobility

                        Integrates behavioral science, artificial intelligence and transportation technology to shape travel behavior, design mobility systems and business, and reform transportation policies. Introduces methods to sense travel behavior with new technology and measurements; nudge behavior through perception and preference shaping; design mobility systems and ventures that integrate autonomous vehicles, shared mobility, and public transit; and regulate travel with behavior-sensitive transport policies. Challenges students to pilot behavioral experiments and design creative mobility systems, business and policies.

                        Fall
                        3-0-9
                        Graduate
                        Schedule
                        MW 9:30 - 11:00 AM
                        Location
                        4-149
                        HASS
                        S
                        Can Be Repeated for Credit
                        No
                        11.485

                        Southern Urbanisms

                        Guides students in examining implicit and explicit values of diversity offered in "Southern" knowledge bases, theories, and practices of urban production. With a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa, considers why the South-centered location of the estimated global urban population boom obligates us to examine how cities work as they do, and why Western-informed urban theory and planning scholarship may be ill-suited to provide guidance on urban development there. Examines the "rise of the rest" and its implications for the making and remaking of expertise and norms in planning practice. Students engage with seminal texts from leading authors of Southern urbanism and critical themes, including the rise of Southern theory, African urbanism, Chinese international cooperation, Brazilian urban diplomacy, and the globally-driven commodification of urban real estate.

                          Fall
                          2-0-10
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          F 10:00AM - 12:00PM
                          Location
                          9-217
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.520

                          Workshop on Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

                          Includes spatial analysis exercises using real-world data sets, building toward an independent project in which students critically apply GIS techniques to an area of interest. Students build data discovery, cartography, and spatial analysis skills while learning to reflect on power and positionality within the research design process. Tailored to GIS applications within planning and design and emphasizes the role of reflective practice in GIS.

                          Fall
                          2-2-2
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          MW 2:30 - 4:00PM (Lecture)
                          MTR 4:30 - 6:30PM (Recitation Sessions)
                          H2
                          Location
                          9-354 (Lecture)
                          9-554 (Recitation Sessions)
                          Prerequisites
                          11.205 or permission of instructor
                          Preference Given To
                          MCP students
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.523

                          Fundamentals of Spatial Database Management

                          Develops technical skills necessary to design, build, and interact with spatial databases using the Structured Query Language (SQL) and its spatial extensions. Provides instruction in writing highly contextual metadata (data biographies). Prepares students to perform database maintenance, modeling, and digitizing tasks, and to critically evaluate and document data sources. Databases are implemented in PostgreSQL and PostGIS; students interface with these using QGIS.

                          Fall
                          2-2-2
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          TR 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
                          H1
                          Location
                          10-401
                          Prerequisites
                          11.205 or permission of instructor
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.524

                          Advanced Geographic Information System Project

                          Provides instruction in statistical approaches for analyzing interrelation, clustering, and interdependence, which are often key to understanding urban environments. Covers local and global spatial autocorrelation, interpolation, and kernel density methods; cluster detection; and spatial regression models. Develops technical skills necessary to ask spatial questions using inferential statistics implemented in the R statistical computing language. Prior coursework or experience in geographic information systems (GIS) at the introductory level required; prior coursework or experience in R is preferred.

                          Fall
                          arranged
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          TR 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
                          H2
                          Location
                          10-401
                          Prerequisites
                          11.205 and 11.220 or permission of instructor
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.529J
                          15.379J
                          11.029[J], 15.3791[J]

                          Mobility Ventures: Driving Innovation in Transportation Systems

                          This course is designed for students who aspire to shape the future of mobility. The course explores technological, behavioral, policy and systems-wide frameworks for innovation in transportation systems, complemented with case studies across the mobility spectrum, from autonomous vehicles to urban air mobility to last-mile sidewalk robots. Students will interact with a series of guest lecturers from CEOs and other business and government executives who are actively reshaping the future of mobility. Interdisciplinary teams of students will work to deliver business plans for startups or action plans for solving “real world” challenges in established companies, governments or NGOs.

                          John Moavenzadeh
                          Jenny Larios Berlin
                          Fall
                          3-3-6
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
                          Location
                          E25-117
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.540

                          Urban Transportation Planning and Policy

                          Examines transportation policymaking and planning, its relationship to social and environmental justice and the influences of politics, governance structures and human and institutional behavior. Explores the pathway to infrastructure, how attitudes are influenced, and how change happens. Examines the tensions and potential synergies among traditional transportation policy values of individual mobility, system efficiency and “sustainability”. Explores the roles of the government; analysis of current trends; transport sector decarbonization; land use, placemaking, and sustainable mobility networks; the role of “mobility as a service”, and the implications of disruptive technology on personal mobility. Assesses traditional planning methods with a critical eye, and through that process consider how to approach transportation planning in a way that responds to contemporary needs and values, with an emphasis on transport justice.

                          Fall
                          3-0-9
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          F 2:00 - 5:00PM
                          Location
                          9-451
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.592
                          11.092

                          Renewable Energy Facility Siting Clinic

                          Presents methods for resolving facility siting disputes, particularly those involving renewable energy. After completing four modules and a competency exam for MITx certification, students work in teams to help client communities in various cities around the United States. Through direct interactions with the proponents and opponents of facilities subject to local opposition, students complete a stakeholder assessment and offer joint fact-finding and collaborative problem-solving assistance. The political, legal, financial, and regulatory aspects of facility siting, particularly for renewable energy, are reviewed along with key infrastructure planning principles. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

                          Fall
                          2-4-6
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          F 3:00 - 5:00 PM
                          Location
                          9-450A
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.601

                          Theory and Practice of Environmental Planning

                          Cancelled

                          This class is open to all graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) at MIT, Wellesley, or Harvard interested in environmental justice, environmental ethics, the tools of environmental analysis, and strategies for collaborative decision-making. The primary objective of the class is to help each student formulate a personal theory of environmental planning practice appropriate to achieving the implementation of environmental justice and sustainable development goals.

                          The course is taught comparatively, with numerous references to examples from around the world. The course has four parts: Environmental Justice and Environmental Policy-Making, Environmental Ethics and Environmental Policy Debates, Inherent Bias and Environmental Planning Techniques, and Public Participation including Difficult Conversations.

                          This is a required subject for students who might want to pursue the Environmental Planning Certificate in the School of Architecture and Planning.

                          Fall
                          3-0-9
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          TR 3:00 - 4:30PM
                          Location
                          9-451
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.701

                          International Development Planning: Foundations

                          Offers a survey of the histories and theories of international development, and the main debates about the role of key actors and institutions in development. Includes a focus on the impact of colonialism, the main theoretical approaches that have influenced the study and practice of development, as well as the role of actors such as States, markets and civil society in development. Focuses on the interactions between interventions and institutions at different scales, from local, national and global/transnational. Offers an opportunity to develop a focus on selected current topics in development planning, such as migration, displacement, participatory planning, urban-rural linkages, corruption, legal institutions and post-conflict development.

                          Fall
                          3-0-9
                          Graduate
                          Schedule
                          TR 2:30 - 4:00PM
                          Location
                          9-255
                          Prerequisites
                          Restricted to first-year MCP and SPURS students
                          Can Be Repeated for Credit
                          No
                          11.912

                          Advanced Urbanism Colloquium

                          Introduces principal issues in the field of advanced urbanism for discussion and exploration. Includes theoretical linkages between ideas about the culture of cities, processes of urbanization, and urban design. Involves events co-organized by faculty and doctoral students to further engage and inform research. 

                            Fall
                            1-1-1
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            M 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
                            Location
                            E14-140L
                            Prerequisites
                            Preference to doctoral students in the Advanced Urbanism concentration
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.919

                            PhD Workshop

                            This one-credit workshop is for all doctoral students in residence.  The workshop features doctoral student progress on dissertation formulation and findings across all years, panels of particular interest to doctoral students as identified by their representatives on the PhD Committee, and an intellectual space for the sharing of ideas and initiatives within the doctoral community and across the department, including faculty. 

                            Fall
                            0-1-0
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            T 12:30 - 2:00 PM
                            Location
                            9-451
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            Yes
                            11.920

                            Planning in Practice

                            Familiarizes students with the practice of planning, by requiring actual experience in professional internship placements. Enables students to both apply what they are learning in their classes in an actual professional setting and to reflect, using a variety of platforms, on the learning personal and professional - growing out of their internship experience. Through readings, practical experience and reflection, empirical observation, and contact with practitioners, students gain deeper general understanding of the practice of the profession and enhanced understanding of the intersection of structural racism and planning. 

                            Fall
                            Arranged
                            Undergraduate/Graduate
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            Yes
                            11.930

                            Advanced Seminar on Planning Theory

                            Cancelled

                            MOVED TO SPRING 2024

                            Introduces students to key debates in the field of planning theory, drawing on historical development of the field of urban/regional/national planning from 1900 to 2020 in both the US and in newly industrializing countries. Class objectives are for students to develop their own theory of action as they become sensitized to issues of racial and gender discrimination in city building, and understand how planning styles are influenced by a range of issues, including the challenge of ethical practice.

                            Fall
                            2-0-10
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            T 2:00 - 5:00PM
                            Location
                            9-450A
                            Prerequisites
                            Preference given to first year PhD students but will be open to continuing PhD Students and second year Master’s students
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S03
                            11.S951

                            Transportation Shaping Sustainable Urbanization: Connections with Behavior, Urban Economics and Planning

                            Explores changes in the built environment expected from transportation investments, and how they can be used to promote sustainable and equitable cities. Reflects on how notable characteristics of cities can be explained by their historical and current transportation features. From a historical perspective, e.g., discusses how central areas of most European cities created during the pre-modern transportation era are more walkable, dense, and diverse; and the auto-oriented North American suburbs sprawling during the massive increase in car ownership. Introduces theoretical basis and empirical evidence to analyze the urban transformation autonomous vehicles will bring and how shared mobility services affect travel behavior, and its implications from an urban planning perspective. Lectures interspersed with guest speakers and an optional field trip. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students.

                            Adriano Borges Ferreira Da Costa
                            Fall
                            2-0-1
                            Undergraduate
                            Schedule
                            TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM
                            Meets 9/12 - 10/5 (8 meetings)
                            Location
                            9-217
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S187
                            11.S954

                            Applied Data Science for Cities

                            Urban analytics draws upon statistics, visualization, and computation to better understand and ultimately shape cities. This course emphasizes telling stories about cities and neighborhoods covering a set of fundamental concepts of descriptive approaches, quantitative and spatial analysis in R, and principles of reproducible data analysis. Students learn to communicate the results of visualization and analysis for use in decision-making and policy development and to critique those processes.

                            Fall
                            2-2-2
                            Undergraduate
                            Schedule
                            MW 9:30 - 11:00 AM, H2
                            Location
                            9-450
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S188
                            11.S953

                            Indigenous Water and Energy Planning: Emergent Futures in Scaling Traditional Ecological Knowledge

                            This under/graduate-level reading seminar focuses on the critical intersections between Indigenous knowledge systems, water resources management, and environmental jus-tice. The course centers readings in genres of Indigenous futurisms to cover the basics of Indigenous water and energy planning. Through the lens of these genres, guest lec-tures, discussions, and case studies, students will understand the emergent trends in the development of traditional ecological knowledge. At the end of the course, students will propose speculative projects to scale community-based water planning interventions and initiatives towards utility scale to support the sovereignty and self-determination of In-digenous governments.

                            Jean-Luc Pierite
                            Fall
                            2-0-10
                            Undergraduate
                            Schedule
                            F 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
                            Location
                            9-255
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S189
                            11.S955

                            e-Planning, Urban Science and Digital Transition

                            This special subject studies the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) on community life, policy making and governance by addressing current major issues and research questions regarding e-Planning, Urban Information Systems, and Urban Science.  The subject meets weekly on Thursdays for 1.5 hours and is linked to (a) weekly Monday lunch talks (Speaker Series) on “Urban Science and Digital Transition: e-Planning twenty years later “ and (b) a day-long “International Conference on Public Participation and Information Technologies” on November 10.
                             
                            New technologies enable more efficient delivery of urban services, broader public participation, more empowerment of diverse constituencies, and improved government transparency. Yet social inequality and wealth concentration have worsened, action on climate integrity is meager, and trends in who collects and controls the vast amounts of new data risks privatizing public goods, increasing surveillance, and threatening democratic governance. So what explains the difference? We focus on planning and policy-making concerning two major inter-connected transitions: Energy & Digital. e-Planning studies Digital technology in planning, but also the Transition: where we stand, and where it will lead us.
                             
                            In 2003, MIT's DUSP offered the first e-Planning Seminar. Significant changes in the past 20 years require that we improve our multi-disciplinary understanding of ICT-driven changes in our daily lives and the ways in which we construct and regulate our communities.  This special subject is a unique opportunity to reflect on where we have been as well as where we are headed through discussion that includes the original 2003 seminar organizers. Theoretical linkages between urban science, digital economics and digital politics will be explored to address issues like Geography of Inequality, Digital Sovereignty, Technology Innovation and Property Rights, The Cost of "Free", new models of Politics and Business, Privacy & Liberties vs. Efficiency & Security, Digital Inclusion, Local Government and Citizen Empowerment, Urban Mobility and Smart Cities.
                             
                            Students will attend Seminar and Symposium talks (or their recorded video), participate in small-group discussion, and write two short reports commenting on one or more talks, and proposing a researchable ‘urban science’ based question, hypothesis, or planning strategy regarding the next twenty years. An option will be to present a communication at the Symposium, and / or contribute to the main collective product of the Fall's e-Planning Seminar Series, namely, a Book on "e-Planning for Digital Transition with no one left behind.

                            Pedro Ferraz de Abreu
                            Fall
                            1-0-2
                            Undergraduate
                            Schedule
                            R 2:30 - 4:00 PM, beginning September 14
                            Location
                            9-217
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S942

                            Urban Design Studio Module 1

                            City Design Research Module 1 for Joint Urban Design Studio, weeks 1-7.

                            The joint urban design studio will be offered as 2 modules beginning in spring 2023. Module 1 is the city design research part (7 weeks + spring break trip); Module 2 is the continuation of the design studio (additional 7 weeks = 14 total weeks). The new modular system, especially module 1, is geared towards DUSP students who want to go through the design research and project programming phase of a joint urban design studio, at the city scale, but do not necessarily want to produce their own site design projects in the end. This will allow planning students to work within the real world capacity of the planner or urban designer through ‘informing’ the studio’s design project goals and parameters. Module 1 students will work in mixed collaborative groups with students enrolled for the full semester studio.

                            Module 1 (sign up only for 11.S942) City Design Research, is 12 credits (0-6-6) and is 7 weeks long including attendance on the class studio trip during spring break (location TBD, costs covered). Module 1 is created for those students who want to learn how to conduct research on a metropolitan scale to find and identify future design projects to bring to the attention of stakeholders. This module will focus on ‘reading’ the metro landscape through analytical representation and mapping, landscape and infrastructural thinking, quantifying waste and redundancies in the urban fabric, discovering where new equity and programming can be infilled, and how to build advocacy and communication with potential stakeholder groups. The recommendations from students in Module 1 will form the basis for design studio projects that students will conduct in Module 2. While students who only sign up for Module 1 will technically be done with the course at the end of the 7-week module, they are expected to participate in one class review during Module 2 for the students who sign up for both modules (the whole joint urban design studio).

                            Module 2 is for students who wish to continue into the design studio portion of the class for 21 total credits (0-12-9) or the whole semester. Students cannot sign up for module 2 individually. You must either sign up for module 1, or module 1+2 (or the entire 21 credit studio).

                            Rafi Segal
                            Fall
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            TR 1:00 - 6:00 PM
                            H1
                            Location
                            10-485
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S943

                            The Role of History in Planning the Just City

                            Knowing how a place has been shaped over time is essential to understanding its present and possible future. The urban designer/planner must ask: What is this place in the process of becoming? Which of its features are clues to ongoing processes that continue to exert a decisive influence, and which are merely artifacts of the past that assert little influence now? Which features are amenable to change and which are resistant? What are the stories residents tell of their shared experiences of place? It is difficult to answer such questions without understanding how a place evolved, through what processes and actions, when, and which of its features and stories have had a sustained impact. A historical perspective puts these patterns and stories in context and suggests their relevance for planning the future, especially powerful when combined with an ecological and social justice perspective.

                            Fall
                            3-0-3
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            W 2:00 - 5:00 PM , H2
                            Location
                            10-401
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S944

                            People in Other Buildings

                            Too often writing is treated as peripheral rather than central to scholarship—it’s the drudgery that follows the important work of curiosity, research, analysis—but this mischaracterization is to the peril of the scholar. The craft of writing is also a crucial means of deepening academic research and presentation, developing scholarly communities, and developing habits of socialization into an academic field. This seminar will focus on writing for an audience that is broader than those huddled around one’s specialization—as the scholar and journalist Carlo Rotella once described it, an audience of “people in other buildings on campus.” We will work on producing compelling narrative, and will explore what it means—plus learn how—to write for an audience beyond one’s academic field. We will work on growing as writers and as editors who focus on structure, character, voice, tone, scenes, description, and fact-checking to produce more robust scholarship as we become more attuned to the relationship between scholarly discourse and research and socialization into one’s discipline. We will have visits from some of the country’s best scholars, writers, and editors, who will share their experiences and insights to expand our ambitions and lift our sights on what writing can accomplish.

                            Prerequisites/Co-requisites: An application letter Send a letter (of no more than 700 words) describing your academic research and interests, areas of intellectual focus, and related curiosities. All participants are required to work on an academic paper, journal article, dissertation chapter, book chapter, or magazine article rooted in academic research. Say what writing you will bring to the seminar and what you hope to accomplish with it, and discuss any interests in the seminar beyond improving your writing.

                            Fall
                            2-0-10
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            T 3:00 - 5:00 PM
                            Location
                            9-450
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S948

                            The City at Night

                            The nocturnal city has too often been presented as a zone of danger, licentiousness, and crime. But the city at night is more than the sum of our fears: it’s a time of mystery, romance, exploration, creativity, labor, and urban regeneration. This writing-intensive seminar aims to recover the many meanings and multiple possibilities of the night, exploring how our understandings of culture, urban development, social and economic exclusion, climate, and governance are deepened by a close look at the night. Through a study of the night—and by delving into fields such as night-studies, journalism, art history, sociology--we will explore the politics and poetics of the city—via literature, music, film art, architecture, urban planning—and raise new questions and possibilities for how to plan and design for the city at night and the many who flee from and run to it.

                            Prerequisites/Co-requisites: Application letter required: In no more than 750 words, explain your interest in the course and how the city reveals itself to you with more complexity at night, discussing a work—architecture, art, literature, film, song—that you find especially moving in how it explains or reveals the character of the city at night.

                            Enrollment Limitations: Class maximum of twelve students, all of whom are only admitted via consideration of their application essays.

                            Fall
                            3-0-9
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            T 6:00 - 9:00 PM
                            Location
                            9-450
                            Prerequisites
                            Application letter required:
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S951
                            11.S03

                            Transportation Shaping Sustainable Urbanization: Connections with Behavior, Urban Economics and Planning

                            Explores changes in the built environment expected from transportation investments, and how they can be used to promote sustainable and equitable cities. Reflects on how notable characteristics of cities can be explained by their historical and current transportation features. From a historical perspective, e.g., discusses how central areas of most European cities created during the pre-modern transportation era are more walkable, dense, and diverse; and the auto-oriented North American suburbs sprawling during the massive increase in car ownership. Introduces theoretical basis and empirical evidence to analyze the urban transformation autonomous vehicles will bring and how shared mobility services affect travel behavior, and its implications from an urban planning perspective. Lectures interspersed with guest speakers and an optional field trip. 

                            Adriano Borges Ferreira Da Costa
                            Fall
                            2-0-1
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            TR 11:00AM - 12:30PM
                            Meets 9/12 - 10/5 (8 meetings)
                            Location
                            9-217
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S953
                            11.S188

                            Indigenous Water and Energy Planning: Emergent Futures in Scaling Traditional Ecological Knowledge

                            This under/graduate-level reading seminar focuses on the critical intersections between Indigenous knowledge systems, water resources management, and environmental jus-tice. The course centers readings in genres of Indigenous futurisms to cover the basics of Indigenous water and energy planning. Through the lens of these genres, guest lec-tures, discussions, and case studies, students will understand the emergent trends in the development of traditional ecological knowledge. At the end of the course, students will propose speculative projects to scale community-based water planning interventions and initiatives towards utility scale to support the sovereignty and self-determination of In-digenous governments.

                            Jean-Luc Pierite
                            Fall
                            2-0-10
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            F 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
                            Location
                            9-255
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S954
                            11.S187

                            Applied Data Science for Cities

                            Urban analytics draws upon statistics, visualization, and computation to better understand and ultimately shape cities. This course emphasizes telling stories about cities and neighborhoods covering a set of fundamental concepts of descriptive approaches, quantitative and spatial analysis in R, and principles of reproducible data analysis. Students learn to communicate the results of visualization and analysis for use in decision-making and policy development and to critique those processes.

                            Fall
                            2-2-2
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            MW 9:30 - 11:00 AM, H2
                            Location
                            9-450
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S955
                            11.S189

                            e-Planning, Urban Science and Digital Transition

                            This special subject studies the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) on community life, policy making and governance by addressing current major issues and research questions regarding e-Planning, Urban Information Systems, and Urban Science.  The subject meets weekly on Thursdays for 1.5 hours and is linked to (a) weekly Monday lunch talks (Speaker Series) on “Urban Science and Digital Transition: e-Planning twenty years later “ and (b) a day-long “International Conference on Public Participation and Information Technologies” on November 10.
                             
                            New technologies enable more efficient delivery of urban services, broader public participation, more empowerment of diverse constituencies, and improved government transparency. Yet social inequality and wealth concentration have worsened, action on climate integrity is meager, and trends in who collects and controls the vast amounts of new data risks privatizing public goods, increasing surveillance, and threatening democratic governance. So what explains the difference? We focus on planning and policy-making concerning two major inter-connected transitions: Energy & Digital. e-Planning studies Digital technology in planning, but also the Transition: where we stand, and where it will lead us.
                             
                            In 2003, MIT's DUSP offered the first e-Planning Seminar. Significant changes in the past 20 years require that we improve our multi-disciplinary understanding of ICT-driven changes in our daily lives and the ways in which we construct and regulate our communities.  This special subject is a unique opportunity to reflect on where we have been as well as where we are headed through discussion that includes the original 2003 seminar organizers. Theoretical linkages between urban science, digital economics and digital politics will be explored to address issues like Geography of Inequality, Digital Sovereignty, Technology Innovation and Property Rights, The Cost of "Free", new models of Politics and Business, Privacy & Liberties vs. Efficiency & Security, Digital Inclusion, Local Government and Citizen Empowerment, Urban Mobility and Smart Cities.
                             
                            Students will attend Seminar and Symposium talks (or their recorded video), participate in small-group discussion, and write two short reports commenting on one or more talks, and proposing a researchable ‘urban science’ based question, hypothesis, or planning strategy regarding the next twenty years. An option will be to present a communication at the Symposium, and / or contribute to the main collective product of the Fall's e-Planning Seminar Series, namely, a Book on "e-Planning for Digital Transition with no one left behind.

                            Pedro Ferraz de Abreu
                            Fall
                            1-0-2
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            R 2:30 - 4:00 PM, beginning September 14
                            Location
                            9-217
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.S957

                            Advanced Doctoral Workshop: Political Economy of the Climate Crisis

                            This course is an advanced doctoral workshop on the political economy of climate change. The workshop aims to provide Ph.D. students working on climate change, across sectors and disciplines, with a foundation in the theoretical and methodological approaches of polit-ical economy to conceptualize and conduct independent research. Substantively, the work-shop takes a critical political economy approach to the climate crisis and examines three in-terrelated dimensions: (1) the political governance challenge of mobilizing climate action, given the need to design new institutional mechanisms to address the global and intergener-ational distributional aspects of climate change; (2) the economic challenge of devising new institutional approaches to equitably finance climate action in ways that go beyond the cur-rently dominant economic rationale; and (3) the cultural challenge – and opportunity – of empowering an adaptive socio-cultural ecology through traditional knowledge and local-level social networks to achieve climate resilience. 

                            Fall
                            2-1-9
                            Graduate
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            Yes
                            11.ThG

                            Graduate Thesis

                            Program of research and writing of thesis; to be arranged by the student with supervising committee.

                            Fall
                            Arranged
                            Graduate
                            Schedule
                            TW 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
                            Location
                            9-450A
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            Yes
                            11.THTJ
                            4.ThTJ

                            Thesis Research Design Seminar

                            Designed for students writing a thesis in Urban Studies and Planning or Architecture. Develop research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, and draft introductory and methodology sections.

                            Fall
                            3-0-9
                            Undergraduate
                            Schedule
                            TR 9:30 - 11:00 AM
                            Location
                            9-255
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No
                            11.UAR
                            1.UAR
                            3.UAR
                            5.UAR
                            12.UAR
                            15.UAR
                            22.UAR

                            Climate and Sustainability Undergraduate Advanced Research

                            Provides instruction in effective research, experiential projects, internships, and externships, including choosing and refining problems, surveying previous work and publications, industry best practices, design for robustness, technical presentation, authorship and collaboration, and ethics. Supporting content includes background and context pertaining to climate change and sustainability, as well as tools for sustainable design. Focus for project work includes research topics relevant to the MIT Climate & Sustainability Consortium (MCSC). Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises, in the context of an approved advanced research project. A total of 12 units of credit is awarded for completion of the spring and subsequent fall term offerings. Application required; consult MCSC website for more information.

                            D. Plata
                            E. Olivetti
                            Fall
                            2-0-4
                            Undergraduate
                            Schedule
                            M W 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
                            Location
                            32-144
                            Can Be Repeated for Credit
                            No