Two DUSP Students Named Switzer Fellows

Each year, 20 promising environmental leaders are selected by their academic institution or environmental experts to be named as the year's Switzer Fellows.  In 2017, this select group included two DUSP students: Adam Hasz and Doug McPherson:

DRAN New Virtual Symposium

Why has displacement become a key academic theme, is the academic displacement literature useful for understanding the phenomena, and is displacement best conceptualized as global, local, or in a comparative context?

In a new virtual symposium, New Directions in Displacement Research, initiated by Professor Balakrishnan Rajagopal and co-edited by Sai Balakrishnan, Harvard Graduate School of Design, and Nicholas Blomley, Simon Fraser University, leading scholars engage with these questions and more to generate reflections on the field and deepen our understanding of displacement.

How can we help overcome barriers to adoption of technological solutions for urban water pollution?

One of the leading causes of water pollution is runoff from continued urbanization and aging urban infrastructure. Two new technologies, green and smart infrastructure systems, are often proposed to improve stormwater management. DUSP’s Dr. Ting Meng and Professor David Hsu, with Professor Bridget Wadzuk from Villanova University, examine the perspectives of local agency officials in Pennsylvania to better understand the perceived advantages and disadvantages of these proposed technologies, and to suggest how to overcome barriers to adoption.

How do energy measurement and disclosure policies affect energy consumption?

Buildings are responsible for about 40% of primary energy consumption and one-third of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. As part of energy efficiency efforts, governments increasingly require building owners to measure and disclose their energy use, but do these policies themselves affect energy consumption? In a new article for Energy, DUSP’s Dr. Ting Meng and Professor David Hsu and the University of Calgary's Dr.

Jessica Myers: Liberté, Égalité, Sécurité

As an undergraduate at Princeton University, Jessica Myers MCP ’17 threw herself into writing a thesis on urban food markets in New Orleans. After many months of work, however, she was disappointed to see it filed away, virtually unread. For her graduate thesis in MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP), she was determined to resist that fate.

Justin Steil on the Trump administration travel ban

On June 26, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments relating to President Donald Trump's recent executive order on travel, which limits individuals from six majority-Musliim countries and refugees worldwide from entering the United States. The court also ruled to uphold a limited version of the travel ban, which went into effect on June 29. President Trump cited this as “a clear victory for our national security.”

How are individuals with multi-cultural backgrounds applying their experience and skills to innovate in science, technology, and pedagogy at MIT?

Zach Merchant, television host of Unscripted on Arlington Public News, recently sat down with DUSP’s faculty member, Bruno Verdini, to discuss the approach to his popular undergraduate course, 11.011 The Art and Science of Negotiation and his forthcoming book by MIT Press, Winning Together: The Natural Resource Negotiation Playbook

Are startups dividing cities by creating unaffordable urban 'utopias' that price out people of color and the middle class?

DUSP's Assistant Professor Justin Steil joins Richard Florida and Dev Davis on National Public Radio's OnPoint, hosted by Tom Ashbrook, to discuss the shifting dynamics of urban inequality. To listen to this podcast click here.

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