Struggling to stay out of high-poverty neighborhoods: housing choice and locations in moving to opportunity's first decade

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 4:28pm

Improving locational outcomes emerged as a major policy hope for the nation's largest low-income housing program over the past two decades, but a host of supply and demand-side barriers confront rental voucher users, leading to heated debate over the importance of choice versus constraint. In this context, we examine the Moving to Opportunity experiment's first decade, using a mixed-method approach.

Moving to Opportunity: The Story of an American Experiment to Fight Ghetto Poverty

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 4:25pm

Moving to Opportunity tackles one of America's most enduring dilemmas: the great, unresolved question of how to overcome persistent ghetto poverty. Launched in 1994, the MTO program took a largely untested approach: helping families move from high-poverty, inner-city public housing to low-poverty neighborhoods, some in the suburbs.

Economic Development Finance

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 4:15pm

Economic Development Finance is a comprehensive and in-depth presentation of private, public, and community financial institutions, policies and methods for financing local and regional economic development projects. The treatment of policies and program models emphasizes their applications and impact, key design and management issues, and best practices.

Double Trouble: Black Mayors, Black Communities, and the Call for a Deep Democracy

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 4:09pm

J. Phillip Thompson III, an insider in the Dinkins administration, provides the first in-depth look at how the black mayors of America's major cities achieve social change. Black constituents naturally look to black mayors to effect great change for the poor, but the reality of the situation is complicated. Thompson argues that African-American mayors, legislators, and political activists need to more effectively challenge opinions and public policies supported by the white public and encourage greater political inclusion and open political discourse within black communities.

Manufacturing Time: Global Competition in the Watch Industry, 1795-2000

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 3:21pm

Since the large-scale manufacture of personal timepieces began, industry leadership has shifted among widely disparate locations, production systems, and cultures. This book recounts the story of the quest for supremacy in the manufacture of watches--from the cottage industries of Britain; to the preeminence of Switzerland and, later, the United States; to the high-tech plants of Japan and the sweatshops of Hong Kong.

Service-Led Rural Development: Definitions, Theories, and Empirical Evidence

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 3:17pm

Two opposing views of service-led development contend, on the one hand, that services can be a propulsive force in rural economic development and, on the other, that services are neither independent of, nor a replacement for, older forms of rural industrialization such as agriculture, mining, and manufacturing. Both views fail to account for the dualistic nature of rural services growth, which does not mirror the developmental experience commonly associated with services in the nation's cities.

From Combines to Computers: Rural Services and Development in the Age of Information Technology

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 3:10pm

Through an analysis of national data and detailed case studies, From Combines to Computers examines how the transition to a service economy is playing out for rural America. It answers two important questions: Will services fill the gap left by lost farming, manufacturing, and mining jobs? And will services stabilize, even revitalize, rural areas?

U.S. Auto Parts Production: An Analysis of the Organization and Location of a Changing Industry

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 3:07pm

Several authors contend that changes in the organization of auto assembly are resulting in a spatial reconcentration of employment in the Midwestern United States. Hypotheses about spatial reconcentration do not take into account the structure of the auto parts industry and the extent that changes in assembly warrant a spatial reorganization of parts production. Using location and employment data for auto parts production, this analysis reveals that the current distribution of auto parts manufacturing varies by product, market, and corporate strategy.

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