Spring 2013 EPP Newsletter

The Spring 2013 issue of DUSP's Environmental Policy and Planning Newsletter is now available.

This issue focuses on student research, including work with faculty as well as theses and dissertations. As you’ll see, students are working on a broad range of topics, from climate adaptation to energy politics to parking regulation to brownfield restoration. They are capitalizing on the expertise available throughout the department and the Institute; they are producing reports that answer practical questions and appeal to a variety of audiences.

Three DUSP Students Awarded Rappaport Fellowships

Three MIT/DUSP students have been named to participate in the Harvard Kennedy's School's Rappaport Institute Public Policy Fellowship Program this summer.

DUSP Alum Profile: Adele Fleet Bacow (MCP 1977)

We recently asked a number of alumni to share their reflections on the value of their DUSP education.  From time to time, we will feature their responses in this space.

"In retrospect, what made my DUSP education special was that DUSP gave me an opportunity to stretch my thinking, learning, and confidence in planning and community development while working with people with amazing backgrounds, talent, and creative minds.

Infrastructural Monument: Infrastructure for the Long Haul

This spring, the Center for Advanced Urbanism staged its first symposium — Infrastructural Monument: Infrastructure for the Long Haul — to consider how best to approach the challenge of replacing or reconstructing our urban infrastructure in ways that will address a widening range of urban problems. It was the first in a series devoted to a set of strategic design challenges facing cities worldwide.

Whatever Happened To 'Urbanism'?

In the United States, urban form and design changed tremendously during the twentieth century. From the early twentieth century, a time when small-scale, highly diverse city blocks or what Douglas Rae called “urbanism” predominated, urban redevelopment came to be dominated by large-scale modernist superblocks, often promoted by federal policy. In the last two decades of the century, some urban designers argued for recapturing the physical qualities of the premodern city, while others argued that large-scale, autonomous city areas were both inevitable and ideal.

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