DUSP's Sarah Williams Named to MIT Innovation Initiative Advisory Committee

President L. Rafael Reif has announced his intention to create an MIT Innovation Initiative, and has selected two faculty members to lead the effort.

In an email to the MIT community, Reif named Fiona Murray, the Alvin J. Siteman (1948) Professor of Entrepreneurship, and Vladimir Bulović, the Fariborz Maseeh Professor in Emerging Technology, to lead the MIT Innovation Initiative. He also named a 19-member Advisory Committee to assist Murray and Bulović in developing recommendations on next steps, including DUSP's own Assistant Professor Sarah Williams.

Harvey Michaels on Smart Grids and Energy Efficiency

DUSP Lecturer Harvey Michaels was recently interviewed by the Association for Demand Resonse and Smart Grid.  In the Q&A, he makes the case that "we need creative, fact-based consensus-building on related aspects of Utility of the Future," including "decisions on paradigms for distribution infrastructure, regulatory models, and energy market design." 

Quantitative Reasoning & Statistical Methods: Syllabus and Notes

Syllabus and Orientation Notes for 11.220, Quantitative Reasoning & Statistical Methods for Planning (as taught in Spring 2011).

Placemaking

Public places play a key role in building community and placemaking can empower local communities to create a sense of "belonging" through place. A new report by a DUSP research team, led by Susan Silberberg, examines the interactions between placemaking, community participation, and the expanding ways communities are collaborating to make great public places.

To dowload the paper or executive summary, use the links in the sidebar.

SMART/SimMobility on CNBC

DUSP Professor Joe Ferreira was featured on CNBC's "The Edge" in a segment featuring MIT's SMART/SimMobility project. 

MIT, Delft, and Wageningen to Partner on "Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions"

Based on the results of a competitive call for proposals, the City of Amsterdam' has announced that its new science institute -- the "Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions" -- is to be developed by collaboratively by MIT, Delft University and Wageningen University.  The group's proposal was "head and shoulders above the other short-listed entries," according to Robbert Dijkgraaf, chairman of the jury.  "Amsterdam will be getting something really new: a scientific institute of technology which will develop expertise in practical urban issues."

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