What is the future of affordable housing on Martha's Vineyard?

In cooperation with Harvard University, Island Food Products, and Island Housing Trust, DUSP students are exploring innovative methods for increasing access to affordable housing on Martha's Vineyard.
To read more about this exciting project be sure to read the full article on MVTimes here.

Connecting theory and research with application in the field

The Infrastructure, Smart Cities and Transportation Workshop, co-hosted by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) and Parsons, was held on March 8, 2017. Many of the speakers and participants were DUSP students and faculty, seeking ways to marry their innovative research with direct, actionable, application in the real world.

What are the causes and consequences of continued segregation in our communities and urban landscape?

What can students learn from bringing scholars, policy makers, community organizers, and activists together to discuss a subject on a transparent and open forum? How does a personal theory and philosophy of justice engage with the field of planning?

In this DUSP Faculty Video, Assistant Professor Justin Steil discusses these topics in relation to his work with the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy with Ingrid Gould Ellen and his pedagogy for weaving justice into his courses at MIT.

Excellence in Public Service Awards: Call for Applications

We are now accepting applications for the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning "Excellence in Public Service Awards."  Deadline: May 1, 2017.

Purpose.  In 1999, DUSP established the Fund for Excellence in Public Service to raise funds to assist and encourage graduates from the Master in City Planning (MCP) program who choose to pursue public service careers.  The Excellence in Public Service Awards, as the Fund’s first initiative, is designed to advance three purposes:

What defines a shrinking city?

What strategies are these shrinking cities engaging to rebuild? How are the diverse strategies they employ similar and how are they informed by urban planning theory? What are the implications of suburbanization of historically urban environments?

These questions and more are answered as Associate Professor Brent Ryan delves into his work behind his book Design After Decline.

Did we correct systemic issues that contributed to the financial crisis of 2007-2008?

On Wednesday March 22, Janelle Knox-Hayes hosted the second Finance, Geography, and Sustainability Speaker Series featuring guest speaker Anat Admanti from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and DUSP's own Gabriella Carolini.

The recording of the Speaker Series is available now (the recording of Gabriella's response is forthcoming).

Without national organization, what led to the widespread and relatively uniform adoption of solitary confinement across the US?

Solitary confinement in U.S. prisons has become long-term and common. Prisoners in solitary spend twenty-three hours a day in featureless cells, with no visitors or human contact for years on end. Without national organization, what led to the widespread and relatively uniform adoption of solitary confinement across the US? What factors determine who is placed in solitary confinement and what rights do these prisoners have?

2017 MSCP Scholar Series Now Available Online

With all the amazing events occurring around DUSP recently, you may have missed some of the 2017 MSCP Scholar Series presentations. Perhaps you would like to revisit a particular data point or policy idea. Luckily, the entire series is now available online via the DUSP YouTube channel.

How is power exercised through control over space?

Currently, how does this spatiality of power interact with law, planning, policy, and the responsibilities of academics? What are the implications of this interaction for housing in the United States?

We are pleased to bring you the next DUSP Faculty Video, featuring Assistant Professor Justin Steil.

What are the dynamics of rental affordability in Boston?

For most Americans who rent their home, housing is consuming a growing share of their household budget. Rents have risen significantly in the past two decades while incomes for the majority have not kept pace. As a result, roughly half of renter households nationwide are currently paying more than 30 percent of their income on rent. Further, approximately 12 million households in the United States spend more than half of their income on housing.

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