Journal Article
Valuing New Development in Distressed Neighborhoods: Does Design Matter?

We estimate the effect of design on the assessed values of new housing units in high-poverty Chicago census tracts with a parcel-based hedonic regression in which we distinguish between three urban design types: enclave, traditional neighborhood development (TND), and infill. We find that urban design significantly affects housing values, and infill housing is more highly valued than either enclave or TND housing. We also examine the influences of individual urban design features and find that residents prefer entrances that face the street, and facades constructed from the same material as adjacent buildings. They also prefer parking in front of their homes, and to be buffered from public streets. We interpret the former to be preferences for greater integration into the surrounding neighbourhood, consistent with our findings on infill.

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsRyan BD, Weber R
JournalJournal of the American Planning Association
Volume73
Issue1
Date Published04/2007
ISSN0194-4363
Abstract

We estimate the effect of design on the assessed values of new housing units in high-poverty Chicago census tracts with a parcel-based hedonic regression in which we distinguish between three urban design types: enclave, traditional neighborhood development (TND), and infill. We find that urban design significantly affects housing values, and infill housing is more highly valued than either enclave or TND housing. We also examine the influences of individual urban design features and find that residents prefer entrances that face the street, and facades constructed from the same material as adjacent buildings. They also prefer parking in front of their homes, and to be buffered from public streets. We interpret the former to be preferences for greater integration into the surrounding neighbourhood, consistent with our findings on infill.