Book
Systemic Design© Can Change the World

Systemic Design© Can Change the World calls attention to the larger scale forces in the built and natural environment. When these forces are revealed and understood, it radically affects the way planners and designers conceive and define projects and thus avoid superficial cosmetics or post-rationalized form. Systemic Design seeks to reveal interactions between environmental, economic, and programmatic stresses across larger territories beyond the project site, rather than restricting focus to isolated locations and strict building envelopes. One of the principal contributions of this approach is to encourage multi-scalar thinking in the planning and urban design process. Readers of the projects within this book, from Berger's P-REX lab at MIT, acquire an ability to see how natural and artificial systems dynamically function across regional territories and small locales, ultimately imagining planning and designing scenarios that feedback and improve systems along this continuum of scales.

Title
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsBerger A
PublisherSun Publishers
CityNetherlands
ISBN978-90-8506-8761
Abstract

Systemic Design© Can Change the World calls attention to the larger scale forces in the built and natural environment. When these forces are revealed and understood, it radically affects the way planners and designers conceive and define projects and thus avoid superficial cosmetics or post-rationalized form. Systemic Design seeks to reveal interactions between environmental, economic, and programmatic stresses across larger territories beyond the project site, rather than restricting focus to isolated locations and strict building envelopes. One of the principal contributions of this approach is to encourage multi-scalar thinking in the planning and urban design process. Readers of the projects within this book, from Berger's P-REX lab at MIT, acquire an ability to see how natural and artificial systems dynamically function across regional territories and small locales, ultimately imagining planning and designing scenarios that feedback and improve systems along this continuum of scales.