Conference Paper
Older Adult Perceptions of Smart Home Technologies: Implications for Research, Policy & Market Innovations in Healthcare

Aging is the social factor shaping the future of the vast majority of nation's today. A combination of longer life and decreased fertility rates are driving a demographic transition from the once ‘normal’ population distribution of many young people with few older people to a distribution that reflects many more people over age 50 than there are children. Industrialized economies, primarily Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development or OECD states will face accelerated aging when the baby boomers of North America and Europe and Dankai of Japan begin turning 65. Europe, already with more older people than children, will have twice the number of elderly than children by 2050. Even developing economies, such as China, are now facing a virtual geriatric explosion with nearly 140 million people already over 60. In fact, the United Nations revised World Population Prospects estimates that by 2045 humankind will have set a historical first where the number of people over age 60 will be greater than the number of children under age 15.

Title
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsCoughlin J
EditorD'Ambrosio L.A.
Tertiary AuthorsReimer B.
Conference Name2007 29th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Date Published10/2007
PublisherIEEE
Conference LocationLyon, France
ISBN Number978-1-4244-0787-3
Abstract

Aging is the social factor shaping the future of the vast majority of nation's today. A combination of longer life and decreased fertility rates are driving a demographic transition from the once ‘normal’ population distribution of many young people with few older people to a distribution that reflects many more people over age 50 than there are children. Industrialized economies, primarily Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development or OECD states will face accelerated aging when the baby boomers of North America and Europe and Dankai of Japan begin turning 65. Europe, already with more older people than children, will have twice the number of elderly than children by 2050. Even developing economies, such as China, are now facing a virtual geriatric explosion with nearly 140 million people already over 60. In fact, the United Nations revised World Population Prospects estimates that by 2045 humankind will have set a historical first where the number of people over age 60 will be greater than the number of children under age 15.

URLhttp://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/4352665/