Journal Article
Direct and Indirect Associations Between the Built Environment and Leisure and Utilitarian Walking in Older Women

Background

The built environment predicts walking in older adults, but the degree to which associations between the objective built environment and walking for different purposes are mediated by environmental perceptions is unknown.

Purpose

We examined associations between the neighborhood built environment and leisure and utilitarian walking and mediation by the perceived environment among older women.

Methods

Women (N = 2732, Mage = 72.8 ± 6.8 years) from Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and California completed a neighborhood built environment and walking survey. Objective population and intersection density and density of stores and services variables were created within residential buffers. Perceived built environment variables included measures of land use mix, street connectivity, infrastructure for walking, esthetics, traffic safety, and personal safety. Regression and bootstrapping were used to test associations and indirect effects.

Results

Objective population, stores/services, and intersection density indirectly predicted leisure and utilitarian walking via perceived land use mix (odds ratios (ORs) = 1.01–1.08, 95 % bias corrected and accelerated confidence intervals do not include 1). Objective density of stores/services directly predicted ≥150 min utilitarian walking (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.22). Perceived land use mix (ORs = 1.16–1.44) and esthetics (ORs = 1.24–1.61) significantly predicted leisure and utilitarian walking,

Conclusions

Perceived built environment mediated associations between objective built environment variables and walking for leisure and utilitarian purposes. Interventions for older adults should take into account how objective built environment characteristics may influence environmental perceptions and walking.

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsTroped PJ, Tamura K, McDonough MH, Starnes HA, James P, Ben-Joseph E, Cromley E, Puett R, Melly SJ, Laden F
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume51
Issue2
Pagination282–291
Date Published04/2016
ISSN0883-6612
Abstract

Background

The built environment predicts walking in older adults, but the degree to which associations between the objective built environment and walking for different purposes are mediated by environmental perceptions is unknown.

Purpose

We examined associations between the neighborhood built environment and leisure and utilitarian walking and mediation by the perceived environment among older women.

Methods

Women (N = 2732, Mage = 72.8 ± 6.8 years) from Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and California completed a neighborhood built environment and walking survey. Objective population and intersection density and density of stores and services variables were created within residential buffers. Perceived built environment variables included measures of land use mix, street connectivity, infrastructure for walking, esthetics, traffic safety, and personal safety. Regression and bootstrapping were used to test associations and indirect effects.

Results

Objective population, stores/services, and intersection density indirectly predicted leisure and utilitarian walking via perceived land use mix (odds ratios (ORs) = 1.01–1.08, 95 % bias corrected and accelerated confidence intervals do not include 1). Objective density of stores/services directly predicted ≥150 min utilitarian walking (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.22). Perceived land use mix (ORs = 1.16–1.44) and esthetics (ORs = 1.24–1.61) significantly predicted leisure and utilitarian walking,

Conclusions

Perceived built environment mediated associations between objective built environment variables and walking for leisure and utilitarian purposes. Interventions for older adults should take into account how objective built environment characteristics may influence environmental perceptions and walking.

URLhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12160-016-9852-2
DOI10.1007/s12160-016-9852-2