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STL Lab Lecture on "Ghost Cities: the Role of Citizens and the Government"

This past semester, Dr. Max Woodworth visited DUSP's STL Lab to deliver a lecture entitled “Ghost Cities: the Role of Citizens and the Government.”

DUSP, CRE, and STL Lab award $1.1 million in second round of faculty research funding

The Samuel Tak Lee MIT Real Estate Entrepreneurship Lab (STL Lab), in conjunction with the Center for Real Estate (CRE) and the Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP), has announced its second round of faculty research grants, awarding $1.1 million to nine MIT researchers and their teams.

Named after alumnus and global real estate developer Samuel Tak Lee ’62, SM ’64, the STL Lab promotes social responsibility among entrepreneurs and thought leaders in the real estate profession worldwide, with a particular focus on China.

“Beijing Studio” celebrates 30 years

This winter, China released its 13th “Five-Year Plan,” a socioeconomic blueprint for designing the country’s future. Alongside measures to improve per capita income, life expectancy, air and water quality, innovation, and other initiatives to build a healthier and more prosperous society, the plan also calls for “new-type urbanization.”

MIT Affirmative Art: Action Through Creativity

Art has always been a tool for self-expression, but what if it could unlock people’s ambitions and their vision of how they can better themselves and their communities?

A new project by SPURS Fellow Eirik Trondsen call Affirmative Art explores this question.  The effort is profiled in a story -- and video -- on the Alumni Association's Slice of MIT page.

New Book: Janelle Knox-Hayes, The Cultures of Markets

Oxford University Press has published a new book by DUSP Professor Janelle Knox-Hayes, entitled The Cultures of Markets: The Political Economy of Climate Governance.  From the publisher's description:

Senseable City Lab: Cities of tomorrow

New book by Senseable City Lab researchers presents vision of data-driven urban design.

Cities can be confusing, messy places. Traffic jams make it hard to get around. Public transit can be puzzling. Trash piles up. So what can make cities function better?

Tenured and Tenure-Track Faculty Positions in Urban Planning

The Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) seeks outstanding faculty candidates for multiple positions. We are looking for individuals who can enhance our efforts to improve the quality of life in and resilience of the world’s urban regions through planning, design, and policymaking. We are especially interested in candidates who have expertise in the study of countries and regions of the Global South.

Student Research: Resilience on the Jersey Shore

In her MCP thesis, "Learning through Competition: Resilience on the Jersey Shore after Rebuild By Design," Catherine Ferrara (MCP 2016) examined the effects of design competitions on efforts to rebuild the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy.

Making cities smarter

Imagine your city as it might be in the not-so-distant future.

Transportation in this city is various, pleasant, and low-impact. There are safe and efficient bike lanes, and anyone can order a cheap ride from an autonomous, minimal-emissions vehicle. Because fewer people drive, and almost no one idles in traffic, air quality is high. There are plenty of parks and open spaces because cars are less prevalent. Life in your city is happy, healthy, and sustainable. Your city is, above all, a smart city.

Housing Debate: "No Easy Pathway out of Poverty"

An essay by DUSP Professor Larry Vale and PhD Student Nick Kelly kicks off the latest debate in NYU's "The Dream Revisited" series.  The article, entitled "From Public Housing to Vouchers: No Easy Pathway out of Poverty," discusses the history of research and practice aimed at ending persistent poverty.

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