Power Centrality . . .Testing the Splintering Urbanism Theory with Social Media data from Santiago de Chile

Submitted by Phil Sunde on Mon, 07/21/2014 - 11:35am

Francisco Humeres (MCP ’14) focused on Power Centrality as a method for measuring a particular feedback property: How well connected are places to other well connected places. In this research Power Centrality is used to assess a recent model of Urban Structure; The Splintering Urbanism Theory of Graham and Marvin (2001). This theory posits that the contemporary city is a fragmented agglomeration of isolated urban pieces where distant but valuable fragments are highly connected between them, bypassing their less valuable surroundings.

Street-Level Air Quality through a Cyclist-Led, Crowdsourced Map in Singapore and Mexico

Submitted by Phil Sunde on Mon, 07/21/2014 - 10:33am

In her thesis, Amalia R. Holub (MCP '14) explores the feasibility of creating a street-level air quality map, whereby cyclists gather data through a participatory sensing process as they ride around the city. Two primary areas were studied: the state of the technology for portable air quality monitors, and the likelihood of cyclist participation in gathering data. Amalia conducted experiments in Singapore and Mexico City to determine whether a small, relatively inexpensive monitor can gauge variation in concentrations according to distance from traffic and route choice.

Capturing the Impacts of Land Use on Travel Behavior: A Comparison of Modeling Approaches

Submitted by Phil Sunde on Thu, 07/17/2014 - 1:45pm

 Most urban planning literature suggests that compact and mixed-use neighborhoods correlate with lower vehicle kilometers traveled (VKT), and accordingly, lower energy consumption and transportation-related emissions. In her thesis, Veronica Hannan examined the daily travel behavior in Santiago de Chile to understand how demographic structure, neighborhood design, and regional accessibility influence travel behavior as measured through emitted grams of five criteria pollutants (CO2, VOCs, PM10, CO and NO).

Transportation Data As Disruptive Innovation in Mexico City

Submitted by Phil Sunde on Thu, 07/17/2014 - 1:30pm

Emily Eros (MCP '14) studied the growing ubiquity of affordable mobile phones and internet-capable devices and how some developing cities are collecting and compiling this data. Her thesis uses a 2013 data collection project to explore the potential impacts of transportation information on microbus regulators, owners/operators, and users. Her findings suggest that increased static information may increase government power with respect to microbus operators, particularly during franchising negotiations, but that it may offer limited benefits to users.

M. Bin Jung - former HCED MCP student awarded a Fulbright Grant

Submitted by Harriette Crawford on Thu, 07/17/2014 - 9:44am

Congratulations to Melanie Bin Jung on winning a Fulbright grant.

Melanie Bin Jung, from New York, completed a master's degree in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning this past spring. She is interested in social and economic justice and has helped truck drivers in Seattle campaign for better conditions. The Fulbright grant will take Jung to Mexico, where she will do research on informal settlements on the edge of Mexico City.

students and alumni win Fulbright grants

Submitted by Eran Ben-Joseph on Wed, 07/16/2014 - 6:34pm

 

Five of the nine Fulbright grants awarded to MIT students went to DUSP students.

Mitchell Cook, from Arkansas, is currently a doctoral student in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning. His interest in discovering the causes of social and economic inequalities in cities has led him to conduct projects in China and India. The Fulbright grant will allow him to return to India to study urban finance reform in Bangalore.

Academia and Disaster Planning

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Tue, 07/15/2014 - 8:04am

DUSP Lecturers Mary Anne Ocampo and Stephen Gray have written a new story on the Sasaki blog describing their recent class on disaster planning and alternative futures for south shore Long Island.  The class challenged graduate students to imagine new designs for the Massapequas, a community southeast of Levittown, New York, that is characterized by dense single-family suburban development, asking students to consider the site not only as a physical location, but also as a dynamic construct influenced by natural, cultur

Caitlin Cameron (MCP 2012) Wins DUSP Excellence in Public Service Award

Submitted by Ezra Glenn on Tue, 07/08/2014 - 2:26pm

At the Annual Commencement Breakfast and Awards Ceremony for 2013-2014, the Department of Urban Studies and Planning was pleased to name Caitlin Cameron (MCP 2012) as the winner of this year's Excellence in Public Service Award.

The prize was established in 1999 to encourage graduates from MIT's Master in City Planning program who choose to pursue public service careers, and to recognize outstanding public service achievements by recent MCP graduates. Winners received up to $10,000 to reduce outstanding education debt.

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