Regulation of Chemicals, Radiation, and Biotechnology

Lectures, class discussion, two exams, short writing assignments(s). Focuses on policy design and evaluation in the regulation of hazardous substances and processes. Includes weekly classes on risk assessment, industrial chemicals, pesticides, food contaminants, pharmaceuticals, radiation and radioactive wastes, product safety, workplace hazards, indoor air pollution, biotechnology, victims' compensation, and administrative law. Health and economic consequences of regulation, as well as its potential to spur technology changes, are discussed for each regulatory regime.

The Once and Future City

Examines the evolving structure of cities, the dynamic processes that shape them, and the significance of a city's history for its future development. Develops the ability to read urban form as an interplay of natural processes and human purposes over time. Field assignments in Boston provide the opportunity to use, develop, and refine these concepts. Enrollment limited.

American Urban History I

Seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. Focuses on readings and discussions.

The Art and Science of Negotiation

Introduction to negotiation theory and practice. Applications in government, business, and nonprofit settings are examined. Combines a "hands-on" personal skill-building orientation with a look at pertinent theory. Strategy, communications, ethics, and institutional influences are examined as they shape the ability of actors to analyze problems, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes in social, organizational, and political circumstances characterized by interdependent interests.

Introduction to International Development

This course introduces undergraduates to the political economy of international economic development planning, using an applied, quantitative approach. Why has development taken place in some countries but not in others? We will move through the major theories and models of development and underdevelopment, providing tools to understand the mechanisms and processes behind economic growth and broader notions of “progress.” The course offers an alternative view of development, focusing on the persistence of dichotomies in current theory and practice.

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