Fall 2013

Semester Start Date: 
Sunday, September 1, 2013

Urban Films: My Brooklyn (2012)

Billed as "the real story behind the takeover of America's hippest city," the film follows director Kelly Anderson's personal journey, as a Brooklyn "gentrifier" seeking to understand the forces reshaping her neighborhood along lines of race and class. Anderson moves to Brooklyn in 1988, lured by cheap rents and bohemian culture, but by the election of Michael Bloomberg in 2001 a massive speculative real estate boom is rapidly altering the neighborhood.

Urban Films: King Corn (2007)

Special Thanksgiving feature. A feature documentary about two friends, one acre of corn, and the subsidized crop that drives our fast-food nation. In the film, two friends move to the heartland to learn where their food comes from. With the help of neighbors, genetically modified seeds, and powerful herbicides, they plant and grow a bumper crop of America's most-productive, most-subsidized grain on one acre of Iowa soil. But when they try to follow their pile of corn into the food system, what they find raises troubling questions about how we eat---and how we farm.

Urban Films: Mission Hill & the Miracle of Boston (1978)

Once a predominantly Irish neighborhood of houses, churches, and small stores, after World War II Boston's Mission Hill began to change: thousands of units of public housing were built---and allowed to decay there; nearby hospitals expanded, displacing people from their homes; developers and speculators bought and sold property and built twenty-story apartment buildings. A new, poor population and an affluent professional population arrived to compete for parts of the old neighborhood.

Urban Films: Good Fortune (2010)

A provocative exploration of how massive international efforts to alleviate poverty in Africa may be undermining the very communities they aim to benefit. In Kenya's rural countryside, Jackson's farm is being flooded by an American investor who hopes to alleviate poverty by creating a multimillion-dollar rice farm. Across the country in Nairobi, Silva's home and business in Africa's largest shantytown are being demolished as part of a U.N. slum-upgrading project.

Urban Films: Cape Spin! An American Power Struggle (2011)

This tragicomic tale explores the surreal and fascinating battle over America's largest clean energy project. When energy entrepreneur Jim Gordon first proposed putting 130 wind turbines in fabled Nantucket Sound, he had no idea that a firestorm would erupt, as the country's first proposed offshore wind farm triggered a schism in this idyllic coastal region, pitting neighbor against neighbor and environmentalist against environmentalist.

Urban Films: 5 Broken Cameras (2011)

This Palestinian-Israeli-French co-production presents a deeply-personal first-hand account of life and non-violent resistance in Bil'in, a West Bank village surrounded by Israeli settlements. Filmed by Palestinian farmer Emad Burnat, who bought his first camera in 2005 to record the birth of his youngest son Gibreel, the collaboration follows one family's evolution over five years of village upheaval.

Urban Films: Beaubourg (1977)

The great Neo-Realist Roberto Rossellini’s beautiful and languid final film documents the opening of the Pompidou Centre in Paris, candidly presenting a city's response to a major new cultural phenomenon.

Territorial Form/ Forms of Territory

Neeraj Bhatia

This lecture will examine the concept of pluralism in defining new forms of urban territories.

This lecture is part of the CAU fall lecture series, full list available here 

 

Neeraj Bhatia

Co-Director, InfraNet Lab, Founder, The Open Workshop

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