Journal Article
Water Resources and Hydrological Management

Water resources refer to fresh surface waters and groundwater that are subject to various types of hydrological management (i.e., human measurement, use, control, and conservation). Key hydrologic processes in the world's water cycle include precipitation as snow and rain, interception of rainfall by plants, infiltration into soil surfaces, evaporation and transpiration by plants, runoff and snowmelt into streams, lakes, and wetlands, erosion and sedimentation of those surface water bodies, recharge of groundwater aquifers, and ultimately discharge into saline coastal waters. Human activities convert hydrologic processes into water resources that serve various purposes. Water resources can also be defined as systems of supply, demand, treatment, use, recycling, wastewater treatment, discharge, and reuse until water ultimately returns to the atmosphere or ocean. Hydrologic management strives to mitigate water hazards that include floods, droughts, mudslides, accelerated erosion, land subsidence, and storm surge. Other water-related risks include water pollution, dam failure, and water-borne disease. These water problems can give rise to human conflicts, and can be aggravated by conflicts over other issues. Water resources planning strives to address such conflicts by generating alternatives for fulfilling desired water uses in ways that support efficient, equitable, and sustainable water governance from the international to national, regional, and local scales.

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsWescoat J
JournalThe International Encyclopedia of Geography
Abstract

Water resources refer to fresh surface waters and groundwater that are subject to various types of hydrological management (i.e., human measurement, use, control, and conservation). Key hydrologic processes in the world's water cycle include precipitation as snow and rain, interception of rainfall by plants, infiltration into soil surfaces, evaporation and transpiration by plants, runoff and snowmelt into streams, lakes, and wetlands, erosion and sedimentation of those surface water bodies, recharge of groundwater aquifers, and ultimately discharge into saline coastal waters. Human activities convert hydrologic processes into water resources that serve various purposes. Water resources can also be defined as systems of supply, demand, treatment, use, recycling, wastewater treatment, discharge, and reuse until water ultimately returns to the atmosphere or ocean. Hydrologic management strives to mitigate water hazards that include floods, droughts, mudslides, accelerated erosion, land subsidence, and storm surge. Other water-related risks include water pollution, dam failure, and water-borne disease. These water problems can give rise to human conflicts, and can be aggravated by conflicts over other issues. Water resources planning strives to address such conflicts by generating alternatives for fulfilling desired water uses in ways that support efficient, equitable, and sustainable water governance from the international to national, regional, and local scales.

URLhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781118786352.wbieg0620/abstract
DOI10.1002/9781118786352.wbieg0620