Journal Article
Immigrant Locations and Native Residential Preferences in Spain: New Ghettos?

International migration made the Spanish population grow by 10 percent between 1998 and 2008. This paper studies where migrants settled and how natives reacted to such a huge and rapid inflow, the largest and fastest migration-induced increase in the OECD. Our results show the existence of two types of neighborhoods in metro areas: city centers where immigrants clearly displaced natives and suburbs into which both natives and immigrants located. The resulting average segregation levels in Spain mask vast differences across neighborhoods and immigrant nationalities.

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsMoraga JFernández, Ferrer A, Saiz A, Seminar UAB
JournalIAE, CSIC
Abstract

International migration made the Spanish population grow by 10 percent between 1998 and 2008. This paper studies where migrants settled and how natives reacted to such a huge and rapid inflow, the largest and fastest migration-induced increase in the OECD. Our results show the existence of two types of neighborhoods in metro areas: city centers where immigrants clearly displaced natives and suburbs into which both natives and immigrants located. The resulting average segregation levels in Spain mask vast differences across neighborhoods and immigrant nationalities.

URLhttp://ferrer.iae-csic.org/InmigrantLocation_Spain.pdf