Socioeconomic Impact Analysis of Yellow-dust Storms: An Approach and Case Study for Beijing

Submitted by Selene Victor on Thu, 12/13/2012 - 2:50pm

Dust storms can extensively disrupt socioeconomic activities and pose hazards to human health and the ecosystem; yet no one has made a systematic analysis of dust storms from an economic perspective. Using a case study for Beijing in 2000, we present a preliminary analysis of socioeconomic impacts of yellow-dust storms, integrating regional economic analysis models with environmental-economic evaluation techniques. Our analyses demonstrate that the

Evaluating environmental and economic benefits of yellow dust storm-related policies in north China

Submitted by Selene Victor on Tue, 12/11/2012 - 4:59pm

Yellow-dust storms (YDSs) have attracted increasing attention worldwide in the past decade. They can extensively disrupt socioeconomic activities and pose hazards to ecosystems, as well as to human health. In recent years, China has invested multi-billions of dollars to mitigate the impact of YDSs. However, the effectiveness of such YDS control programmes has rarely been evaluated. This research develops a causal model to quantify the environmental benefits of YDS control programmes in China, and further employs regional economic models to evaluate the ensuing economic impacts.

Comprehensive evaluation of effects of straw-based electricity generation: A Chinese case

Submitted by Selene Victor on Thu, 12/06/2012 - 3:05pm

Greater use of renewable energy is being aggressively promoted to combat climate change by the Chinese government and by other governments. Agricultural straw is the kind of renewable energy source that would become a pollution source if it is not well utilized. We select the Shiliquan straw-based electricity generation project in Shandong Province, China as a case and assess environmental externalities of straw utilization in power plants by using life-cycle analysis.

Comprehensive evaluation of effects of straw-based electricity generation: A Chinese case

Submitted by Selene Victor on Thu, 12/06/2012 - 3:01pm

Greater use of renewable energy is being aggressively promoted to combat climate change by the Chinese government and by other governments. Agricultural straw is the kind of renewable energy source that would become a pollution source if it is not well utilized. We select the Shiliquan straw-based electricity generation project in Shandong Province, China as a case and assess environmental externalities of straw utilization in power plants by using life-cycle analysis.

Antagonistic bioenergies: Technological divergence of the ethanol industry in Brazil

Submitted by Selene Victor on Thu, 12/06/2012 - 1:55pm

We present evidence for the coexistence of two antagonistic sugarcane ethanol production technologies in Brazil, with the Southeast region of the country having relatively mechanized production processes, and the Northeast area using labor-intensive ones.We highlight the main differences between the handproduction and fully automated mechanicalmanufacturing in the Brazilian ethanol industry and examine the historical, political, and economic factors that induced this regional technology gap that is currently observed.

Land Recycling in China and its Implication for the Regional Economy

Submitted by Selene Victor on Thu, 12/06/2012 - 12:12pm

Since 2000, many cities in China have moved their large-scale manufacturing plants from urban to suburban or other less-developed regions. This inter- or intra-regional plant relocation not only leads to changes in land use patterns but also affects institutional, socioeconomic, and environmental issues both at the local and regional levels. We call this regional restructuring process land recycling, which creates critical energy, environmental,  financial, social, and political implications.

Measuring the energy consumption of China’s domestic investment from 1992 to 2007

Submitted by Selene Victor on Thu, 12/06/2012 - 11:34am

In this study, we first define the energy consumption of domestic investment as the investment-driven energy consumption (IDEC). Then, we build an energy input–output model to identify quantitatively the amounts of China’s IDEC from 1992 to 2007. We also use the model to analyze the sector distributions of the IDEC for the same time period.

Measuring the energy consumption of China’s domestic investment from 1992 to 2007

Submitted by Selene Victor on Thu, 12/06/2012 - 11:32am

In this study, we first define the energy consumption of domestic investment as the investment-driven energy consumption (IDEC). Then, we build an energy input–output model to identify quantitatively the amounts of China’s IDEC from 1992 to 2007. We also use the model to analyze the sector distributions of the IDEC for the same time period.

Measuring the energy consumption of China’s domestic investment from 1992 to 2007

Submitted by Selene Victor on Thu, 12/06/2012 - 11:29am

In this study, we first define the energy consumption of domestic investment as the investment-driven
energy consumption (IDEC). Then, we build an energy input–output model to identify quantitatively
the amounts of China’s IDEC from 1992 to 2007. We also use the model to analyze the sector distributions
of the IDEC for the same time period. The key findings derived from this study improve the understanding
of the effects of China’s domestic investment on its energy consumption expansion and reflect the fact

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