Whatever Happened To 'Urbanism'?

Submitted by Brent D. Ryan on Sun, 06/16/2013 - 5:56pm

In the United States, urban form and design changed tremendously during the twentieth century. From the early twentieth century, a time when small-scale, highly diverse city blocks or what Douglas Rae called “urbanism” predominated, urban redevelopment came to be dominated by large-scale modernist superblocks, often promoted by federal policy. In the last two decades of the century, some urban designers argued for recapturing the physical qualities of the premodern city, while others argued that large-scale, autonomous city areas were both inevitable and ideal.

Autopia's End

Submitted by Brent D. Ryan on Sun, 06/16/2013 - 5:43pm

Since the 1980s, Detroit’s historic building stock of automotive manufacturing facilities has mostly disappeared. Demolition, redevelopment, and abandonment have left little to mark the city’s twentieth-century history as the world capital of the automobile industry. Planning and policy making have been complicit by publicly subsidizing destructive redevelopment and by failing to advocate for retention or preservation of significant structures and complexes. Even today, Detroit’s leadership calls for the demolition of one of the city’s last remaining historic auto factories.

Smart Device and Travel Time Use

Submitted by Jinhua Zhao on Fri, 03/22/2013 - 11:11pm

This research investigates the usage of smart devices and time at bus stops and on buses in Vancouver, Canada. Using passive observations and self-reported surveys mainly from college students, the majority of passengers were found to use their travel time actively. Most of the observed active activities are associated with the usage of smart devices. However, while the possession of smart devices is prevalent, less than one third of passengers used them during travel.

Estimating a Rail Passenger Trip Origin-Destination Matrix Using Automatic Data Collection Systems

Submitted by Jinhua Zhao on Fri, 03/15/2013 - 12:23am

Automatic data collection (ADC) systems are becoming increasingly common in transit systems throughout the world. Although these ADC systems are often designed to support specific fairly narrow functions, the resulting data can have wide-ranging application, well beyond their design purpose. This paper illustrates the potential that ADC systems can provide transit agencies with new rich data sources at low marginal cost, as well as the critical gap between what ADC systems directly offer and what is needed in practice in transit agencies.

Unified estimator for excess journey time

Submitted by Jinhua Zhao on Fri, 03/15/2013 - 12:07am

Excess journey time (EJT), the difference between actual passenger journey times and journey times implied by the published timetable, strikes a useful balance between the passenger's and operator's perspectives of public transport service quality. Using smartcard data, this paper tried to characterize transit service quality with EJT under heterogeneous incidence behavior (arrival at boarding stations). A rigorous framework was established for analyzing EJT, in particular for reasoning about passenger’ journey time standards as implied by varying incidence behavior.

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