Book

The Laws of Nature: Reflections on the Evolution of Ecosystem Management Law and Policy

This timely collection written by an interdisciplinary array of law professors, who specialize in legal and policy issues surrounding ecosystem management, and scholars and practitioners in areas such as environmental policy and planning, conservation, economics, and biology explore why ecosystems must be valued and managed in their own right. The importance of ecosystems has been underestimated. We cannot simply hope ecosystems will benefit from legislation focused on other environmental and natural resource protections, such as those for wildlife, trees, air and water.

The Great Rent Wars

Written by one of the country’s foremost urban historians, The Great Rent Wars tells the fascinating but little-known story of the battles between landlords and tenants in the nation’s largest city from 1917 through 1929. These conflicts were triggered by the post-war housing shortage, which prompted landlords to raise rents, drove tenants to go on rent strikes, and spurred the state legislature, a conservative body dominated by upstate Republicans, to impose rent control in New York, a radical and unprecedented step that transformed landlord-tenant relations.

Structure and Interpretation of City Planning

Being the (partially) recovered transcripts from a groundbreaking effort in artificial intelligence and urban simulation.  See "Preface" of attached pdf for additional background.

[Draft/work-in-progress; see title page for date of latest compile.]

The New Division of Labor

As the current recession ends, many workers will not be returning to the jobs they once held--those jobs are gone. In The New Division of Labor, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane show how computers are changing the employment landscape and how the right kinds of education can ease the transition to the new job market.

Teaching the New Basic Skills

Fifteen years ago, a U.S. high school diploma was a ticket to the middle class. No longer. The skills required to earn a decent income have changed radically. The skills taught in most U.S. schools have not. Today the average 30-year-old person with a high school diploma earns $20,200, and the nation faces a future of growing inequality and division. Teaching the New Basic Skills shows how to avoid such a future.

Systemic Design© Can Change the World

Systemic Design© Can Change the World calls attention to the larger scale forces in the built and natural environment. When these forces are revealed and understood, it radically affects the way planners and designers conceive and define projects and thus avoid superficial cosmetics or post-rationalized form. Systemic Design seeks to reveal interactions between environmental, economic, and programmatic stresses across larger territories beyond the project site, rather than restricting focus to isolated locations and strict building envelopes.

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