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SENSEable City Study of Commuting Times

How much commuting can you tolerate? A new study by DUSP researchers shows that across countries, people assess their commutes by the time it takes them to complete the trip, generally independent of the distance they have to travel — as long as they have a variety of commuting options to chose from.
The study, which compares commuting practices in five locations on four continents, also demonstrates the methodological validity of using mobile phone data to create an accurate empirical picture of commuting.
“Every country has had its own different way of doing things and collecting data,” says DUSP's Carlo Ratti, an associate professor of the practice, director of MIT’s Senseable City Lab, and a co-author of the new study. “Here we have standard data which allows us, for the first time, to evaluate mobility across countries.”
Commuting research has often been conducted via surveys, making it difficult to develop cross-country comparisons. But by using anonymized phone data, the MIT researchers found some fundamentally similar patterns in different locations.
“It really reveals that commuting patterns around the globe are constant,” says Stanislav Sobolevsky, a researcher at the Senseable City Laboratory and a co-author of the paper, published in the journal PLoS ONE. The paper’s co-authors are Ratti, Sobolevsky, Kevin Kung, and Kael Greco, all of the Senseable City Laboratory.
“There was an element of surprise in how well the data showed this,” says Kung, the corresponding author on the paper.

[From the MIT News, Peter Dizikies; click here for full story.]