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Power Centrality . . .Testing the Splintering Urbanism Theory with Social Media data from Santiago de Chile

Francisco Humeres (MCP ’14) focused on Power Centrality as a method for measuring a particular feedback property: How well connected are places to other well connected places. In this research Power Centrality is used to assess a recent model of Urban Structure; The Splintering Urbanism Theory of Graham and Marvin (2001). This theory posits that the contemporary city is a fragmented agglomeration of isolated urban pieces where distant but valuable fragments are highly connected between them, bypassing their less valuable surroundings. The spatial hypothesis of Graham and Marvin is tested empirically through the use of the Power Centrality Measure, applied to a dataset of 242,000 twitter statuses generated by Metro users, while the causal explanation is evaluated by comparing the results with an unbiased sample of 110,000 statuses. The results suggest how Metro could be acting as a mass public bypass that connects these emergent centralities, challenging the concept of premium networks posited by Graham and Marvin. Power Centrality as a Relational measure of Urban Heirarchy. Testing the Splintering Urbanism Theory with Social Media data from Santiago de Chile can be read here.