News

Aug 17, 2017. Posted by Takeo Kuwabara

The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, operates in over 160 countries. Recipients of Fulbright awards represent excellent achievements in their academic and professional lives as well as demonstrated ability and leadership potential in their roles as cultural ambassadors.

Ms. Gordon will conduct her research in the Inner Mongolia, Jiangxi, and Guizhou provinces. She will be studying how governmental policies affect climate change adaptation in China.

Aug 14, 2017. Posted by Takeo Kuwabara

By Yasmin Zaerpoor

For the seventh year, MIT Professor Lawrence Susskind and Tufts Professor Shafiqul Islam hosted an international week-long Water Diplomacy Workshop for water professionals in Boston. This year’s event was hosted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP) at MIT provided wonderful teaching space for this year’s workshop.

Aug 01, 2017. Posted by Takeo Kuwabara

While the relationship between neighborhood effects on health are widely supported by current research, but what do we know about how does health selection into neighborhoods affect the observed link between place and health?

In an article in Preventive Medicine Reports, DUSP's Mariana Arcaya, as well as, Ruth Coleman (Oxford), Fahad Rzazk (Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital), Maria Alva (RTI International), and Rury Holman (Oxford), explore what hidden factors may be informing the connection between where we live and the health outcomes.

Jul 31, 2017. Posted by Ezra Haber Glenn

Each year, 20 promising environmental leaders are selected by their academic institution or environmental experts to be named as the year's Switzer Fellows.  In 2017, this select group included two DUSP students: Adam Hasz and Doug McPherson:

Jul 26, 2017. Posted by Takeo Kuwabara

Why has displacement become a key academic theme, is the academic displacement literature useful for understanding the phenomena, and is displacement best conceptualized as global, local, or in a comparative context?

In a new virtual symposium, New Directions in Displacement Research, initiated by Professor Balakrishnan Rajagopal and co-edited by Sai Balakrishnan, Harvard Graduate School of Design, and Nicholas Blomley, Simon Fraser University, leading scholars engage with these questions and more to generate reflections on the field and deepen our understanding of displacement.

Jul 24, 2017. Posted by Takeo Kuwabara

One of the leading causes of water pollution is runoff from continued urbanization and aging urban infrastructure. Two new technologies, green and smart infrastructure systems, are often proposed to improve stormwater management. DUSP’s Dr. Ting Meng and Professor David Hsu, with Professor Bridget Wadzuk from Villanova University, examine the perspectives of local agency officials in Pennsylvania to better understand the perceived advantages and disadvantages of these proposed technologies, and to suggest how to overcome barriers to adoption.

Jul 17, 2017. Posted by Takeo Kuwabara

Buildings are responsible for about 40% of primary energy consumption and one-third of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. As part of energy efficiency efforts, governments increasingly require building owners to measure and disclose their energy use, but do these policies themselves affect energy consumption? In a new article for Energy, DUSP’s Dr. Ting Meng and Professor David Hsu and the University of Calgary's Dr.

Jul 10, 2017. Posted by Ezra Haber Glenn

As an undergraduate at Princeton University, Jessica Myers MCP ’17 threw herself into writing a thesis on urban food markets in New Orleans. After many months of work, however, she was disappointed to see it filed away, virtually unread. For her graduate thesis in MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP), she was determined to resist that fate.

Jul 10, 2017. Posted by Ezra Haber Glenn

On June 26, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments relating to President Donald Trump's recent executive order on travel, which limits individuals from six majority-Musliim countries and refugees worldwide from entering the United States. The court also ruled to uphold a limited version of the travel ban, which went into effect on June 29. President Trump cited this as “a clear victory for our national security.”

Jun 05, 2017. Posted by Takeo Kuwabara

Arcaya will examine how the emergence of revolutionary health care technology, the evolution of socioeconomic status through the influence of new technologies and ideologies, the shifting inequity in access to health insurance, disparate levels of environmental exposures, and the public health effects of climate change, threaten to accelerate and intensify inequalities in public health in the United States.

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