Urban Films: My Brooklyn (2012)

Billed as "the real story behind the takeover of America's hippest city," the film follows director Kelly Anderson's personal journey, as a Brooklyn "gentrifier" seeking to understand the forces reshaping her neighborhood along lines of race and class. Anderson moves to Brooklyn in 1988, lured by cheap rents and bohemian culture, but by the election of Michael Bloomberg in 2001 a massive speculative real estate boom is rapidly altering the neighborhood. She watches as an explosion of luxury housing and chain store development spurs bitter conflict over who has a right to live in the city and to determine its future. While some people view these development patterns as ultimately revitalizing the city, to others, they are erasing the eclectic urban fabric, economic and racial diversity, creative alternative culture, and unique local economies that drew them to Brooklyn in the first place. No less than the city's soul is at stake. A film by Kelly Anderson and Allison Lirish Dean. 85 minutes.

Please join us for a special Skype Q&A with producer Allison Lirish Dean following the film.

Part of the MIT Urban Planning Film Series, a mostly-weekly series showing documentary and feature films on topics related to cities, urbanism, design, community development, ecology, and other planning issues. Free.  Open to: the general public.