Subjects

instructors
Cauam Ferreira Cardoso
units
3-0-9U
schedule
TR (2:30-4:00) (37-212)
prerequisites
description

This course introduces undergraduates to the basic theory, institutional architecture, and practice of international development. We take an applied, interdisciplinary approach to some of the “big questions” in our field: What does development mean? Why are some countries persistently poorer than others?

instructors
units
3-0-9U
schedule
TR (9:30-11:00) (1-132)
prerequisites
description

Policy makers and analysts around the world are facing difficult policy decisions everyday.  For instance, should informal settlements in a city center be relocated to the urban fringe?  If not, what are the alternatives?  If so, would the relocation project make sense financially, socioeconomically, and politically?  Similarly, should municipalities charge user fees instead o

instructors
units
3-0-6H
schedule
MW (9:30-11:00) (9-354)
prerequisites
description

Presents a theory of comparative differences in international housing outcomes. Introduces institutional differences in the ways housing expenditures are financed, and the economic determinants of housing outcomes, such as construction costs, land values, housing quality, and ownership rates.

instructors
Reinhard Goethert
units
3-0-6H
schedule
TR (11:00-12:30) (1-371)
prerequisites
Permission of Instructor
description

Considers a new interdisciplinary paradigm of practice that regards dialogue among practitioners and users essential for efficacious and creative design and planning process. Focuses on non-traditional client groups: communities, the poor, and the generally excluded middle-income.

instructors
Susan Murcott
units
3-0-6
schedule
TR (9:30-11:00) (N51-350)
prerequisites
description

Focuses on disseminating water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) innovations in developing countries, especially among underserved communities. Structured around field-based learning, case studies, lectures and videos. Emphasis on core WASH principles, culture-specific solutions, appropriate and sustainable technologies, behavior change, social marketing and building partnerships.

instructors
units
3-0-9H
schedule
MW (9:30-11:00) (9-450A)
prerequisites
description

Water and sanitation services are increasingly inundated fields of both study and practice.

instructors
units
3-0-9
schedule
TR (9:30-11:00) (1-132)
prerequisites
description

Policy makers and analysts around the world are facing difficult policy decisions everyday.  For instance, should informal settlements in a city center be relocated to the urban fringe?  If not, what are the alternatives?  If so, would the relocation project make sense financially, socioeconomically, and politically?  Similarly, should municipalities charge user fees instead o

instructors
units
3-0-9H
schedule
TR (9:30-11:00) (9-450A)
prerequisites
description

Examines globally relevant challenges of adequately and effectively attending to public sector responsibilities for basic services with limited resources.

instructors
units
3-0-9G
schedule
MW (2:00-3:30) (5-233)
prerequisites
description

This course will cover four inter-related questions:
(i) What are the theories which explain the emergence and expansion of the urban informal economy?
(ii) What kinds of planning efforts have worked in influencing the quality of life of the urban poor who rely for their livelihoods on urban informal economy?

instructors
units
3-0-6
schedule
T (11:00-12:30), T (12:30-2:00) Lecture Series (9-450A - Class, 9-450AB - Lecture Series )
prerequisites
description

Offered in conjunction with the department-wide Bemis Speaker Series on 'Rethinking Law and Planning,' this seminar explores key themes and challenges in how we should think about law in planning today. Critiques existing approaches and theories, including the limitation of planning law to land-use and zoning, and to domestic law.

instructors
Jason Jackson
units
3-0-6
schedule
M (3:30-5:30) (9-450B)
prerequisites
description

This course is intended for MCP students preparing to conduct international field research. The class will introduce the basics of field research, including different types of data collection and qualitative data analysis techniques. Over the course of the semester, students will develop their ideas for their thesis project and prepare a thesis proposal.