Subjects

instructors
units
3-0-9G
schedule
W (2:00-5:00) (9-450B)
prerequisites
description

Examines the worldwide trends of increasing demographic complexity as it relates to the practice of planning and students’ own capabilities. Students will engage around topics of cultural competency, power analyses, and facilitative leadership through readings, guest speakers, and facilitative leadership training.

instructors
C. Gordon
units
2-0-4H
schedule
TR (4:00-5:30) First half of the term (9-354)
prerequisites
Permission of instructor
description

Develops a strong strategic understanding of how best to deliver various types of projects in the built environment. Examines the compatibility of various project delivery methods, consisting of organizations, contracts, and award methods, with certain types of projects and owners.

instructors
units
3-0-9G
schedule
R (6:00-9:00) (9-354)
prerequisites
description

Building on 11.351, studies key issues of principal asset management agreements, through the lens of the real estate developer/investor, in connection with the value creation, financing and restructuring phases of a real estate venture. Value creation phase focuses on negotiating office and retail leases.

instructors
Walter Torous
units
3-0-6H
schedule
TR (8:30-10:00) (9-354)
prerequisites
15.426J, 15.401, or permission of instructor
description

Investigates the economics and finance of securitization, a practice that allows illiquid assets to be transformed into more liquid securities. Considers the basic mechanics of structuring deals for various asset-backed securities. Investigates the pricing of pooled assets, using Monte Carlo and other option pricing techniques, as well as various trading strategies used in these markets.

instructors
Thomas Kochan
units
3-0-9H
schedule
F (9:00-12:00) (E62-346)
prerequisites
description

This course will focus on innovations occurring at local and state levels as seedbeds for future national employment policies.  We will examine how this has occurred in earlier points in history (e.g.

instructors
units
2-0-4H
schedule
TR (2:30-4:00) First half of the term, Recitation T 5:30-7:00 (9-354)
prerequisites
11.431, 15.401, 15.402, or 15.407
description

The evolving organization and operation of real estate capital markets. Sources of real estate capital. Primary and secondary mortgage markets. The investment behavior of real estate assets. The development of REITs and securitized debt markets. Advanced pricing techniques for complex real estate securities. First half of the term subject. Prerequisites: 11.431, 15.401, 15.402, or 15.407

instructors
units
2-0-4G
schedule
TR (2:30-4:00) Second half of the term, Recitation R 4:00-5:00 (9-354)
prerequisites
description

Introduction to analytical tools to support design and decision-making in real estate and infrastructure development. Particular focus on identifying and valuing sources of flexibility using real options, Monte-Carlo simulation, and other techniques from the field of engineering systems. Integrates economic and engineering perspectives, and is suitable for students with various backgrounds.

instructors
units
4-0-11H / PRACTICUM
schedule
T (2:00-3:30), R (2:00-4:30) (3-401)
prerequisites
11.401 or 11.301, and 11.328
description

Workshop explores the integration of economic development and physical planning interventions to revitalize urban commercial districts.

instructors
units
3-0-12H / PRACTICUM
schedule
R (2:00-5:00) (9-451)
prerequisites
description

Provides students with an opportunity to do team projects in the Dudley neighborhood as part of a ongoing commitment of DUSP to work with the DSNI on projects ranging from the building design, housing, energy, food systems, education, economic cooperatives, community arts and citizen engagement.

instructors
units
3-0-9H
schedule
M (2:00-5:00) (9-450A)
prerequisites
description

This course begins with readings on the subjects of politics and planning, that is, the people. The initial classes will discuss the lives and perspectives of blacks, working class whites, and immigrants as illuminated through fictional narratives. The aim is to ground democracy’s potential within its principal components—the people themselves.